Featured FAQ
All FAQ

It is important to note that the land tax amount is not deductible in the year you pay it. Instead, deductions must be taken in the respective income years to which the land tax liabilities related to. It’s crucial to understand that your liability for land tax is determined by the usage of the property within a given year, regardless of when the tax assessment is actually issued.

When you pay land tax for past years (known as paying “in arrears”), you can’t deduct this payment from your income for the year in which you make the payment. Instead, you can only claim a deduction for the land tax in the years that the tax was originally due for.

For an example – Imagine it’s 2024, and John receives a bill for land tax for the years 2022 and 2023 that he hasn’t paid yet. Even though John pays this bill in 2024, he can’t claim the deduction on his 2024 tax return. Instead, he should claim the deduction for the 2022 land tax on his 2022 tax return, and the deduction for the 2023 land tax on his 2023 tax return, because those are the years the tax relates to, even though he paid it later.

Read the FAQ

You can claim land tax as a tax deduction for your investment properties. However, you cannot claim land tax as an immediate deduction if your property is not generating rental income or if you are using the property for personal use.

Read the FAQ

You are eligible to deduct expenses including interest on loans, local council, water and sewerage rates, land taxes, and emergency services levies incurred during the period of renovating a property intended for rental. It’s important to note, however, that your eligibility for these deductions ceases once your intentions for the property change, such as deciding to use it for personal purposes instead.

Read the FAQ

According to GSTR 2012/6 Airbnb doesn’t fall under commercial residential premises. The definition of ‘commercial residential premises’ in section 195-1 includes the following seven paragraphs, none of which indicate anything similar to Airbnb. This distinction is crucial for understanding the regulatory and tax implications associated with offering or operating Airbnb properties.

  • a hotel, motel, inn, hostel or boarding house. 
  • premises used to provide accommodation in connection with a school; 
  • a ship that is mainly let out on hire in the ordinary course of a business of letting ships out on hire. 
  • a ship that is mainly used for entertainment or transport in the ordinary course of a business of providing ships for entertainment or transport. 
  •  a marina at which one or more of the berths are occupied, or are to be occupied, by ships used as residences. 
  •  a caravan park or a camping ground; or 
  •   anything similar to residential premises described in paragraphs (a) to (e). 

Check out our Comprehensive Guide To Converting Your Long-Term Investment Property To Airbnb Or Short-Term Rental for further information. 

Reference – https://www8.austlii.edu.au/au/other/rulings/ato/ATOGSTR/2012/GSTR20126.pdf

Read the FAQ

The goods and services tax (GST) does not apply to residential rents, so Airbnb hosts do not have to pay it. This also means that you can’t get a GST credit for the costs that go along with it. This is applied even if your sales are more than $75,000, which is the GST threshold.

Please check feel free to check out our Tax Consequence guide for Airbnb. 

Read the FAQ

Starting your investment journey, whether as an employee or a business owner, requires careful consideration of two critical aspects: tax planning and asset protection. These are not just checkboxes on a list; they are foundational pillars that seasoned investors prioritise from the outset. The goal is not merely to accumulate assets but to do so in a way that ensures their longevity and protection.

Asset protection is all about creating a secure environment for your investments. It’s the practice of arranging your assets in a way that minimizes the risk of loss, whether through legal challenges, business debts, or other financial liabilities. The essence of asset protection lies in the foresight to anticipate potential risks and to structure your investments in a way that those risks are mitigated before they can even arise.

Read the FAQ

Transferring existing property and assets to a trust or company for asset protection purposes is possible, but it must be done carefully and in compliance with the law. Such transfers can have tax consequences, including capital gains tax (CGT) and stamp duty. CGT may apply if the transfer results in a capital gain, and stamp duty may be levied depending on your jurisdiction. Additionally, anti-avoidance provisions are in place to prevent tax evasion through asset transfers. It’s crucial to seek legal and tax advice before proceeding to understand the implications and ensure compliance with tax laws and regulations. Each case is unique, and a tailored approach is essential to address both asset protection and tax considerations.

Read the FAQ

The 5-year clawback period, often associated with bankruptcy law, refers to a period of time preceding a debtor’s bankruptcy filing, typically starting from the date of the bankruptcy filing. During this period, a bankruptcy trustee has the authority to review, and potentially reverse certain transactions made by the debtor, such as preferential payments to specific creditors or fraudulent asset transfers. The purpose is to prevent debtors from attempting to shield assets from creditors by engaging in questionable financial transactions shortly before declaring bankruptcy.

Read the FAQ

While it is possible to transfer properties and assets to a trust or a company, doing so with the intent to evade legitimate creditors or legal claims can have serious legal consequences. Transfers made with the intent to hinder, delay, or defraud creditors are typically considered fraudulent and can be challenged by creditors or the court. Australia, like many jurisdictions, has laws in place to prevent fraudulent asset transfers. It’s essential to consult with legal professionals to ensure any asset protection or restructuring measures are done within the bounds of the law and do not violate legal obligations to creditors or the court.

Read the FAQ

No, asset protection strategies cannot provide absolute protection from all types of legal claims or creditors. Certain legal claims, such as child support, alimony, or government obligations, may not be shielded by asset protection measures. Additionally, fraudulent or improper transfers intended to evade legitimate creditors can be challenged and deemed ineffective. Asset protection is best used as a proactive strategy to minimize risks rather than as a guarantee against all possible legal challenges. Consultation with legal and financial experts is crucial for tailored asset protection planning.

Read the FAQ

Asset protection is entirely legal when done within the boundaries of the law and regulatory requirements. It involves prudent financial planning and the use of legal mechanisms to protect assets from unforeseen risks. Engaging in fraudulent activities or hiding assets to evade legitimate creditors is illegal and can result in severe legal consequences.

Read the FAQ

Asset protection refers to strategies and legal mechanisms investors and businesses use to safeguard their assets from potential creditors, lawsuits, or financial risks. It’s crucial because it helps protect your hard-earned assets from being seized or depleted in the event of legal disputes, bankruptcy, or unforeseen financial challenges, ensuring the preservation of your wealth.

Read the FAQ

A bare trust in a Self-Managed Super Fund (SMSF) is a popular structure used to hold an asset, typically a property, when a SMSF implements a Limited Recourse Borrowing Arrangement (LRBA) strategy. A bare trust is a fundamental form of trust arrangement where a trustee is designated to hold property or assets solely on behalf of a clearly identified beneficiary. In this instance, the Self-Managed Super Fund (SMSF) is the ultimate beneficiary. In this type of trust arrangement, the trustee’s role is notably minimal and straightforward, primarily involving the safeguarding and eventual transfer of the trust property to the beneficiary once the loan is paid off, upon the beneficiary’s request.

The trustee, in this context, does not possess discretionary powers or extensive duties beyond this basic obligation. The essence of a bare trust lies in the absolute entitlement of the beneficiary’s’ to both the capital and the income generated by the trust’s assets. For CGT purposes, any disposal of the assets of the trust by a bare trustee will be treated as a disposal by the beneficiary i.e. the SMSF.

Source – ATO – Absolute entitlement 

Read the FAQ

Yes, it is highly recommended to seek legal advice when setting up a Bare Trust for SMSF property investment. Legal professionals can ensure the trust structure complies with all relevant regulations and help draft the necessary legal documents.

Read the FAQ

When selling the property, the proceeds will typically go back to the SMSF, as it holds the beneficial ownership. According to the SMSF’s investment strategy, the funds can then be reinvested or used for retirement benefits.

Read the FAQ

Yes, there are rules and restrictions to be aware of:
• The property held in the Bare Trust must meet the sole purpose test of providing retirement benefits to SMSF members.
• The Bare Trust cannot hold more than one property
• The Bare Trust must not be used for any purpose other than holding the property for the SMSF.
• The SMSF is the only entity that can benefit from the property held in the Bare Trust.

Read the FAQ

While the Bare Trustee holds the legal title, the SMSF has control over property management and decision-making. The SMSF trustee has the authority to make decisions about the property, including leasing, selling, and maintaining it, in line with superannuation laws.

Read the FAQ

Yes, you can use a Bare Trust for both residential and commercial property investments. However, the same rules and restrictions apply, including compliance with the sole purpose test and other SMSF regulations.

Read the FAQ

A Bare Trust is commonly used in SMSF property investment to comply with superannuation and legal regulations. It separates the legal ownership (held by the Bare Trustee) from the beneficial ownership (held by the SMSF), ensuring that the property investment aligns with SMSF rules.

Read the FAQ

A Bare Trust, often used in Self-Managed Super Fund (SMSF) property investments, is a legal arrangement where a trustee holds property or assets on behalf of the SMSF. It is a transparent trust structure where the SMSF holds the beneficial ownership of the property, while the Bare Trustee holds the legal title.

Read the FAQ

Choosing a company or trust structure for your business over a sole trader or partnership offers several advantages. These structures provide limited liability, protecting your personal assets from business debts, making them appealing for risk management. Trusts, particularly discretionary trusts, offer tax efficiency through income distribution among beneficiaries. They also serve well for asset protection and estate planning, allowing for the orderly transfer of assets. Companies, with separate tax rates and perpetual existence, are attractive to investors and convey professionalism, while also facilitating business continuity and scalability. Depending on your specific business goals, legal requirements, and financial situation, consulting with experts such as accountants or legal advisors can help determine the most suitable structure for your needs.

Read the FAQ

Yes, it is possible to have multiple business structures for different aspects of your business, such as a company for one division and a trust for another. Each structure will have its own legal and tax implications.

Read the FAQ

Tax implications vary by structure. Sole traders report business income on their individual tax return. Companies pay tax on their profits at the corporate tax rate. Partnerships and trusts distribute profits to partners or beneficiaries who report them on their individual tax returns.

Read the FAQ

The most common business structure in Australia is the sole trader structure, followed by companies, Trust and partnerships. The choice of structure depends on factors like liability, taxation, and business goals.

Read the FAQ

Choosing the right structure depends on factors like the nature of your business, liability preferences, tax implications, and future growth plans. Consult with a business advisor or accountant for personalized advice.

Read the FAQ

Transferring 50% Property: Navigate Capital Gian Tax Impact

When you sell, transfer, or gift a portion of your investment property to your spouse or partner, you are subject to capital gains tax. However, an exception exists: if the transfer involves your Principal Place of Residence (PPOR), you are exempt from capital gains tax obligations.

Read the FAQ

Empty Home Revival: Selling After 6 Years – Unleash CGT

If you are not treating any other property as your Principal Place of Residence (PPOR), you can continue to treat this property as your primary residence indefinitely after you have stopped residing in it.

Read the FAQ

Empower Your Quest: CGT Concession in Small Business

You are considered a CGT Concession Stakeholder in a company or trust if you are:

  • A significant individual in that company or trust.
  • The spouse of a significant individual and have a small but more than zero percent stake in the company or trust.

You can own this stake either directly or through other entities. To calculate your stake, use the same method as the significant individual test.

You’re a significant individual in a company or trust if you own at least 20% of it. This 20% can include both your direct ownership and indirect ownership through other entities.

Special Note – A spouse of a significant individual must have a participation percentage greater than zero in the business entity.

Read the FAQ

Small Business CGT Concession and Roll-Over Rules:

CGT Event J5 occurs if, after choosing a roll-over for a capital gain, you haven’t acquired a new asset or improved an existing one by the end of the allotted time. Additionally, this event happens if:

  • The new or improved asset isn’t actively used in your business anymore (like if you’ve sold it, it’s now part of your trading stock, or it’s no longer used in your business operations).
  • If the new asset is a share in a company or a trust interest, and it fails the 80% test (unless this failure is only temporary).
  • You or a related entity aren’t significant stakeholders in the company or trust.
  • The stakeholders in the company or trust don’t have a significant (at least 90%) investment in your business. When CGT Event J5 happens, you’ll have to recognize a capital gain. This is the same amount you initially didn’t have to pay tax on because of the small business roll-over. The capital gain is counted at the end of the time you were supposed to get or improve the asset.

Example: CGT event J5
In September 2020, Luke made a capital gain of $80,000 on an active asset. He met the maximum net asset value test.

Luke disregarded the whole capital gain under the small business roll-over.

In September 2022 (the end of the 2-year period), Luke did not have any replacement or capital improved assets. CGT event J5 happens, and Luke makes a capital gain of $80,000 in September 2022.

Source – ATO/ Small Business Rollover

Read the FAQ

While you can technically sell a property for $1, several crucial considerations apply. Tax authorities and legal entities typically assess property transactions based on market value, potentially resulting in tax obligations based on the property’s actual worth, despite the nominal sale price. Stamp duty, capital gains tax, and legal and financial implications, particularly if there are existing mortgages or loans, should be thoroughly evaluated.

Read the FAQ

Yes, Investax accountants are well-versed in CGT calculations. We can help you accurately determine your capital gain by considering various factors, such as the purchase price, sale price, holding period, and eligible deductions.

Read the FAQ

Capital gains in Australia are subject to taxation under the Capital Gains Tax (CGT) regime. If you’ve owned the asset for over 12 months, you may qualify for a 50% CGT discount on the gain, with the remaining 50% added to your taxable income and taxed at your marginal rate. Capital losses from other investments can offset capital gains, and any excess losses can be carried forward. There are exemptions for primary residences, concessions for small businesses, and different tax rates for superannuation funds. For accurate guidance in navigating the complexities of CGT, it’s advisable to consult a tax professional or accountant, such as Investax Accountants, as tax laws may change over time.

Read the FAQ

Capital gain is the financial profit realised when you sell or dispose of an asset, such as stocks, real estate, or valuable possessions, for an amount higher than the original purchase price. It represents the difference between the selling price (proceeds) and the cost basis (purchase price and any associated acquisition costs).

Read the FAQ

CGT is a tax on the profit made from the sale of an asset, including investment properties. If you sell an investment property for more than you paid for it, you may be subject to CGT. However, there are concessions and strategies available to minimize CGT, such as the 50% CGT discount for assets held longer than 12 months and the main residence exemption if the property was your main home for part of the time.

Read the FAQ

The rule that a company must have a public officer doesn’t come from the main company law, which is the Corporations Act 2001. Instead, it’s a tax rule. According to Section 252 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1936, every company that does business in Australia or makes money from property in Australia needs to have a public officer. This public officer represents the company for all tax-related matters. The company itself, or someone with the proper authority from the company, must appoint this public officer.

Read the FAQ

a company is not required to have a secretary, but it if it does, then that secretary (or at least one of them if there is more than one secretary) must ordinarily be a resident of Australia. Refer S.204A.

Read the FAQ

No. At least ONE director has to be resident in Australia. Refer S.201A of the Corporations Act 2001.

Read the FAQ

A Director ID Number is a unique number given to an existing or intending director who has verified their identity with the Registrar.  It is available via the  Australian Business Registry Services (ABRS) website.

  • A director ID is issued to a person forever.
  • A person will keep their director ID even if they stop being a company director, change their name or move interstate or overseas.
  • Director ID is being introduced to provide traceability of a director’s relationships over time, and across companies, to assist regulators and external administrators to investigate a director’s involvement in what may be repeated unlawful activity, including illegal phoenix activity.
  • Both existing and new directors will need to apply.
Read the FAQ

Purchasing property through a company can provide limited liability, protecting your personal assets from the property’s debts or legal issues.

Read the FAQ

Lenders Mortgage Insurance (LMI) is a one-off, non-refundable, and non-transferable premium added to your home loan. It is calculated based on the size of your deposit and the amount you borrow. The larger your contribution to the purchase price of your property, the lower the LMI cost will be. 

Here are some key points about LMI:

  • LMI is typically required if you borrow more than 80% of your home’s value.
  • The insurance is designed to protect the lender, not the borrower.
  • Arranging LMI is not your responsibility; your lender will handle it for you.
  • Increasing your deposit can significantly reduce or even eliminate the need for LMI.
Read the FAQ

Refinancing:

Refinancing is the process of replacing an existing loan with a new one, typically to secure better terms or lower interest rates. You should consider refinancing when interest rates drop significantly, as it can potentially reduce your monthly payments, save money on interest over the life of the loan, or shorten the loan term to pay off debt faster. Additionally, refinancing may make sense if your credit score has improved since you originally obtained the loan, as this can lead to more favourable terms. However, it’s essential to weigh the costs associated with refinancing, including application fees, and closing costs, against the potential benefits to determine if it’s a financially sound decision.

Read the FAQ

To increase your likelihood of loan approval:

  • Maintain a good credit score by making timely payments.
  • Reduce existing debt and manage credit responsibly.
  • Save for a down payment or collateral, if required.
  • Provide accurate and complete financial documentation.
  • Shop around for lenders and loan options.
  • Consider a co-signer if your credit is weak.
  • Address any discrepancies or issues on your credit report.
  • Demonstrate a stable income and employment history.
Read the FAQ

Credit score:

A credit score is a numerical representation of your creditworthiness. It’s calculated based on your credit history, including factors like your payment history, credit utilisation, length of credit history, and more. Lenders use your credit score to assess the risk of lending to you. A higher credit score typically means better loan terms and lower interest rates, while a lower score might result in less favourable terms or loan denials. It’s crucial to monitor and maintain a good credit score to access affordable loans and financial opportunities.

Read the FAQ

Difference between fixed-rate and variable-rate loans:

Fixed-rate loans have a constant interest rate throughout the loan term, providing predictable monthly payments. Variable-rate loans, also known as adjustable-rate loans, have interest rates that can change periodically, typically tied to a benchmark index. Fixed-rate loans offer stability, while variable-rate loans may start with lower rates but come with the risk of higher payments if rates rise. The choice depends on your risk tolerance and market conditions

Read the FAQ

Why Choose a Mortgage Broker Over a Bank Loan?

You might opt to engage a mortgage broker rather than approaching a bank directly because brokers offer several valuable benefits. These independent professionals have access to numerous lenders and loan products, including those from banks, potentially providing you with more favourable terms and rates. Mortgage brokers simplify the loan shopping process, saving you time and effort by researching and comparing various lender offers. They also offer expert advice tailored to your financial situation and goals, helping you navigate complex mortgage terms and conditions. Additionally, brokers may negotiate with lenders on your behalf to secure better terms and can be particularly helpful if you have unique financial circumstances or credit challenges. Their flexibility and convenience in scheduling meetings make the application process smoother. While banks are a valid option, working with a mortgage broker can enhance your choices and provide expert guidance to find the best mortgage for your specific needs.

Read the FAQ

Refinancing is the process of replacing an existing loan with a new one, typically to secure better terms or lower interest rates. You should consider refinancing when interest rates drop significantly, as it can potentially reduce your monthly payments, save money on interest over the life of the loan, or shorten the loan term to pay off debt faster. Additionally, refinancing may make sense if your credit score has improved since you originally obtained the loan, as this can lead to more favourable terms. However, it’s essential to weigh the costs associated with refinancing, including application fees, and closing costs, against the potential benefits to determine if it’s a financially sound decision.

Read the FAQ
  • To increase your likelihood of loan approval:
  • Maintain a good credit score by making timely payments.
  • Reduce existing debt and manage credit responsibly.
  • Save for a down payment or collateral, if required.
  • Provide accurate and complete financial documentation.
  • Shop around for lenders and loan options.
  • Consider a co-signer if your credit is weak.
  • Address any discrepancies or issues on your credit report.
  • Demonstrate a stable income and employment history.
Read the FAQ

A credit score is a numerical representation of your creditworthiness. It’s calculated based on your credit history, including factors like your payment history, credit utilisation, length of credit history, and more. Lenders use your credit score to assess the risk of lending to you. A higher credit score typically means better loan terms and lower interest rates, while a lower score might result in less favourable terms or loan denials. It’s crucial to monitor and maintain a good credit score to access affordable loans and financial opportunities.

Read the FAQ

Fixed-rate loans have a constant interest rate throughout the loan term, providing predictable monthly payments. Variable-rate loans, also known as adjustable-rate loans, have interest rates that can change periodically, typically tied to a benchmark index. Fixed-rate loans offer stability, while variable-rate loans may start with lower rates but come with the risk of higher payments if rates rise. The choice depends on your risk tolerance and market conditions

Read the FAQ

You might opt to engage a mortgage broker rather than approaching a bank directly because brokers offer several valuable benefits. These independent professionals have access to numerous lenders and loan products, including those from banks, potentially providing you with more favourable terms and rates. Mortgage brokers simplify the loan shopping process, saving you time and effort by researching and comparing various lender offers. They also offer expert advice tailored to your financial situation and goals, helping you navigate complex mortgage terms and conditions. Additionally, brokers may negotiate with lenders on your behalf to secure better terms and can be particularly helpful if you have unique financial circumstances or credit challenges. Their flexibility and convenience in scheduling meetings make the application process smoother. While banks are a valid option, working with a mortgage broker can enhance your choices and provide expert guidance to find the best mortgage for your specific needs.

Read the FAQ

Yes, even though you may not have permanent residency or citizenship in Australia, you will still be treated as an Australian resident for tax purposes. Remember, tax residency differs from immigration residency, so don’t let this confuse you. If you are an Australian resident for tax purposes, you can claim the Tax-Free Threshold, which is $18,200. You are eligible to claim it from this payer if one of the following conditions applies:

  • You are not currently claiming the tax-free threshold from another payer.
  • You are already claiming the tax-free threshold from another payer, but your total income from all sources is expected to be less than $18,200.
Read the FAQ

The short answer is yes, but it comes with specific conditions. If you are an overseas student who has arrived in Australia to pursue your studies and are enrolled in a course that lasts more than 6 months, you are generally considered an Australian resident for tax purposes. This status affects how you are taxed and what you need to declare in your TFN declaration to your employer.

Read the FAQ

Yes, even though you may not have permanent residency or citizenship in Australia, you will still be treated as an Australian resident for tax purposes. Remember, tax residency differs from immigration residency, so don’t let this confuse you. If you are an Australian resident for tax purposes, you can claim the Tax-Free Threshold, which is $18,200. You are eligible to claim it from this payer if one of the following conditions applies:

  • You are not currently claiming the tax-free threshold from another payer.
  • You are already claiming the tax-free threshold from another payer, but your total income from all sources is expected to be less than $18,200.
Read the FAQ

The short answer is yes, but it comes with specific conditions. If you are an overseas student who has arrived in Australia to pursue your studies and are enrolled in a course that lasts more than 6 months, you are generally considered an Australian resident for tax purposes. This status affects how you are taxed and what you need to declare in your TFN declaration to your employer.

Read the FAQ

The goods and services tax (GST) does not apply to residential rents, so Airbnb hosts do not have to pay it. This also means that you can’t get a GST credit for the costs that go along with it. This is applied even if your sales are more than $75,000, which is the GST threshold.

Please check feel free to check out our Tax Consequence guide for Airbnb. 

Read the FAQ

Understanding the Nature of Legal Fees for Tax Purposes

The deductibility of legal fees hinges on the nature or character of the expense. This determination is guided by the benefit that is sought through incurring the expense.

  1. Capital vs. Operational Purpose: 
    • Legal fees incurred to create an asset or secure an enduring benefit are considered capital expenditures. These are not deductible under section 8-1 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997 (ITAA 1997), as established in the Sun Newspaper Ltd case (1938). For instance, John purchased a property and incurred legal fees to secure the title deed. Since this legal expense aims to create an asset with an enduring benefit, it is considered a capital expense and is not deductible.

     

    • Conversely, legal fees incurred for operational purposes may be deductible. For example, John, a contractor, sued a client to recover unpaid wages for work completed. Since the sole purpose of the legal action is to recover assessable income, the related legal fees and costs should be deductible.

     

     

  2. Employment-Related Legal Fees: 
    • Lost Wages: If the sole purpose of the legal action is to recover unpaid wages, bonus, contract payment, or leave payments that are assessable to the client, then the legal fees and related costs should be deductible. For instance, John lost his employment unfairly, and his employer didn’t pay his annual leave and long service leave. He sued his employer for unfair dismissal to retrieve his annual leave and long service leave. Since the purpose of the legal action is to recover assessable income, the legal fees should be deductible.

     

    • Reinstatement: If an employee incurs legal fees after termination and one of the purposes is to seek reinstatement to their former position, these expenses are generally of a capital nature. According to the Australian Taxation Office (ATO), such fees are not deductible because they aim to secure an enduring benefit (i.e., reinstatement of employment). For instance, if John also sought reinstatement to his job as part of the legal action, the legal fees related to seeking reinstatement would be considered capital expenses and thus not deductible. For further guidance, refer to paragraph 5 of Taxation Determination TD 93/29.
Read the FAQ

Even if you are not a business owner, you may still be liable for Pay as You Go (PAYG) instalments if you had a tax liability in the previous financial year. This can occur due to several reasons beyond just your employment income.

For instance, you might be an employee with wages, but you also have other sources of income, such as:

  • An investment property that earns positive rental income.
  • A share portfolio that earns dividend income annually.
  • A substantial amount of cash savings that earn interest income.
  • Trust distributions from a related trust.
  • You are liable for the Medicare Levy Surcharge because you do not have appropriate hospital cover for yourself and your family, and your income is above the threshold.

In these cases, your employer only withholds tax on your employment income. However, when you file your tax return, you will need to account for the additional income from these other sources. This often results in a tax payable situation due to the positive income earned on top of your wages.

To manage this, the ATO may require you to make PAYG instalments throughout the year to cover your expected tax liability, helping you avoid a large tax bill at the end of the financial year. If you anticipate lower income this year compared to last year, you may consider varying your last quarter PAYG instalment to improve your cash flow. Feel free to reach out to Investax Group tax specialists if you need any help with this. 

Read the FAQ

Division 293 tax is an extra tax on superannuation contributions. It applies to people whose total income and super contributions add up to more than $250,000 in a year. This tax reduces the tax break they get on their super contributions by making them pay an additional 15% tax on top of the regular 15% tax that super contributions usually attract. 

Division 293 tax is an extra 15% tax. It is applied to the smaller amount between the excess income over $250,000 and the taxable super contributions. Check Sarah’s example below for further explanation.

Your ‘Division 293 Notice of Assessment’ will only be sent to you once the ATO receives the contribution information from your super fund.

The income component of the Division 293 tax calculation is based on the same income calculation used to determine the Medicare levy surcharge (MLS), disregarding any reportable superannuation contributions. The components of this income calculation are:

  • Taxable income (assessable income minus allowable deductions)
  • Total reportable fringe benefits amount
  • Net financial investment loss
  • Net rental property loss
  • Net amount on which family trust distribution tax has been paid
  • Super lump sum taxed elements with a zero-tax rate
  • Assessable first home super saver released amount

Example for John:

John earns a salary of $190,000, and his employer contributes $25,000 into superannuation for him. John also has a net rental property loss of $10,000.

Taxable Income:

  • Salary: $190,000
  • Net rental property loss: -$10,000

So, John’s taxable income is $190,000 – $10,000 = $180,000.

Division 293 Income:

  • Taxable income: $180,000
  • Net rental property loss: +$10,000
  • Employer super contributions: +$25,000

John’s Division 293 income is $180,000 + $10,000 + $25,000 = $215,000, which is within the limit of $250,000. Therefore, John’s entire concessional contributions (CCs) would be taxed at 15%, and Division 293 tax does not apply.

Example for Sarah:

Sarah earns a salary of $240,000, and her employer contributions for the year are $30,000. Sarah also has a net rental property loss of $5,000.

Taxable Income:

  • Salary: $240,000
  • Net rental property loss: -$5,000

So, Sarah’s taxable income is $240,000 – $5,000 = $235,000.

Division 293 Income:

  • Taxable income: $235,000
  • Net rental property loss: +$5,500
  • Employer super contributions: +$27,500

So, Sarah’s Division 293 income is $235,000 + $5,500 + $27,500 = $268,000. Since Sarah’s income exceeds the threshold of $250,000, she will pay 15% contributions tax on her employer contributions and will also be liable for Division 293 tax. Division 293 taxable contributions are the lesser of Division 293 super contributions ($27,500) or the amount above the $250,000 threshold ($18,000). Sarah will pay additional 15% tax on $18,000. 

She can choose to pay this tax personally, or she can choose to release the tax from her super fund.

ATO Reference – Div 293

Read the FAQ

If you are unemployed, claiming deductions for self-education expenses—including related travel and accommodation costs—can be challenging. Usually, you need to be employed and the courses should be related to your job to qualify for these deductions.

The ATO in TR 2023/D1 should corroborate this at paragraph 67 when it states:

“67. To be deductible, the expenses must be relevant to your income-earning activities at the time you incur the expense. A deduction is not available if, at the time you incur the expense, you are not undertaking income-earning activities to derive assessable income, either by employment, carrying on a business or by other means”.

Apart from that, the ATO ruling doesn’t seem to suggest it’s possible to argue that the self-education costs are deductible due to the legacy of a previous role.

Read the FAQ

Yes, you may be able to claim car expenses if you travel for work-related purposes. This includes using your car to perform tasks directly related to your job, such as visiting clients, attending meetings, or traveling between different work locations. Keep accurate travel records, including travel distances and related expenses, to support your claims. Remember that personal trips, such as commuting from home to your regular workplace, are generally not eligible for tax deductions.

Read the FAQ

The Medicare Levy Surcharge is an additional charge imposed on Australian taxpayers who earn above a certain income threshold and do not have adequate private health insurance. Its purpose is to encourage individuals to take out private health cover and relieve some of the pressure on the public healthcare system (Medicare).

Read the FAQ

Yes, you can claim deductions for expenses related to working from home if you meet the eligibility criteria. The ATO introduced a simplified method, which allows you to claim a fixed rate for each hour worked from home.

Read the FAQ

If you miss the October 31st deadline and you’re not using a tax agent, you might face penalties and interest on any tax owing. It’s best to lodge your return as soon as possible to avoid these additional charges.

Read the FAQ

Yes, if you’ve paid more tax than you owe, you can receive a tax refund. This usually happens when your employer withholds more tax than necessary from your wage, you’ve made excess payments throughout the year, or you have large investment losses/negative gearing.

Read the FAQ

In most cases, yes. If you are an Australian resident for tax purposes, you generally need to declare your worldwide income on your Australian tax return. However, certain exemptions and credits might be available based on international tax agreements.

Read the FAQ

The usual deadline for filing your individual income tax return in Australia is October 31st. However, if you are using a registered tax agent, you might be eligible for an extended deadline, generally up to May 15th of the following year.

Read the FAQ

Include all rental-related income as you receive it, get your expenses right by only claiming for periods when the property was used to earn income, and keep detailed records to prove all income and expenses​​.

Read the FAQ

Our expertise in various asset classes, including shares, managed funds, index funds, and cryptocurrencies, is the cornerstone of our services. We possess an in-depth knowledge of the regulatory landscape and the ever-evolving world of cryptocurrencies and blockchain technology. Additionally, we have a deep understanding of various share transactions, ranging from standard activities such as dividends and dividend reinvestment plans (DRP) treatment to more complex transactions like share buybacks and their impact on the cost base for dividend reinvestment plans (DRP).
Furthermore, we provide guidance to clients on various ownership structures, such as Discretionary Family Trusts and company structures, especially when managing large portfolios. Our expertise is designed to ensure that you receive comprehensive support and insights across a broad spectrum of financial assets, allowing you to make informed decisions and optimize your investments.

Read the FAQ

The frequency of your tax payments in Australia depends on various factors, including your income source, business structure, and tax obligations. Here’s a breakdown:
1. Individuals: Most individuals in Australia pay their income tax through the Pay as You Go (PAYG) system, which deducts tax from their wages or salary. This is done on each payday, meaning tax is paid regularly throughout the year. If you have additional income sources, such as investments, you may need to make quarterly or annual payments. At the end of the financial year, you are required to file an annual tax return. You have the option to complete it independently or enlist the services of an accountant, such as Investax Group, to assist in filing your annual tax return.
2. Businesses: Business owners have different tax payment schedules depending on their business structure. If you operate as a sole trader, you will have an annual tax liability, which is typically charged on a quarterly basis through PAYG instalments. On the other hand, if your business operates under a company or trust structure, you will have an annual tax return liability. If your business’s income exceeds $75,000, you will also be required to register for GST, and if you have employees, you must register for PAYG withholding tax. In the case of GST, your tax liability frequency (monthly or quarterly) will be determined by your GST turnover and PAYG withholding tax obligations. Additionally, if your business provides personal benefits to employees, you will be liable for Fringe Benefit Tax (FBT), and an annual FBT return must be submitted each year.
3. Property Owners: If you earn rental income from investment properties, you’ll need to declare this income in your annual tax return.
4. Self-Managed Superannuation Funds (SMSFs): SMSFs generally pay tax on investment income at the concessional rate of 15%. This tax is paid throughout the year, and the fund’s obligations include annual tax returns and potentially quarterly PAYG instalments.
It’s essential to keep accurate records of your income and expenses to ensure you meet your tax obligations promptly and accurately. Consulting with a tax professional like Investax Group can provide personalized guidance on your specific payment schedule and obligations based on your financial situation and business structure.

Read the FAQ

Investax offers a proactive tax reminder service to our existing clients, sending out 3-4 reminders throughout the year to ensure you stay informed about important tax deadlines. Our clients typically benefit from extended deadlines, often until the following May. To receive these essential reminders, we recommend subscribing to our newsletter to stay up-to-date with crucial tax information and deadlines.

Read the FAQ

Yes, Investax accountants are well-versed in CGT calculations. We can help you accurately determine your capital gain by considering various factors, such as the purchase price, sale price, holding period, and eligible deductions.

Read the FAQ

If you miss the October 31st deadline and you’re not using a tax agent, you might face penalties and interest on any tax owing. It’s best to lodge your return as soon as possible to avoid these additional charges.

Read the FAQ

At Investax, we prioritize delivering high-quality service to our clients, and our annual tax return process reflects this commitment. We do not offer on-the-spot tax returns, eliminating the need for in-person meetings. Instead, you can initiate the process by simply forwarding us your relevant information. Our standard turnaround period year-round is typically 4-6 weeks. This timeframe encompasses several crucial quality assurance steps as we meticulously attend to each client’s tax return. These steps involve collecting data, confirming details with our accounting team, reviewing previous files (for new clients), processing data by senior accountants, communication with clients to resolve queries or missing information, thorough review by a Client Manager, sending a draft tax return for your review and feedback, addressing any concerns, finalizing the tax return for review by a Senior Manager and Tax Agent, providing a digital copy for your signature, and invoicing. We maintain a ‘first in, first out’ approach to ensure fairness to all clients. While we understand this process may require patience, our dedication to delivering comprehensive and accurate tax returns without cutting corners remains unwavering. Your trust in Investax allows us to provide you with the best service possible, and we appreciate your understanding of the 4–6-week turnaround period.

Read the FAQ

It’s easy to schedule a consultation with us. Simply complete our complimentary consultation form, and our team will be in touch to set up a meeting at your convenience. We look forward to helping you achieve your financial goals in the medical field.

Read the FAQ

Absolutely, we are committed to staying abreast of the dynamic healthcare industry landscape, including its intricate regulations and ever-evolving tax laws. In fact, we’ve gone a step further by actively contributing to your knowledge base. Our team has authored numerous informative articles addressing crucial topics, such as recent payroll changes relevant to medical practices. Furthermore, we’ve provided insights into the optimisation of medical practices through the implementation of various ownership structures like Discretionary Family Trust and Company. Our dedication to industry-specific expertise ensures that not only are your financial strategies aligned with the latest requirements, but we also empower you with valuable insights to navigate the intricate landscape of the medical field effectively.

Read the FAQ

Our services for medical practitioners encompass a range of solutions, including tax planning, wealth creation strategy in line with tax planning, best practice for practice management, bookkeeping, accounting, retirement planning, and more. We aim to provide comprehensive support to help you achieve your financial goals.

Read the FAQ

Yes, we specialise in providing financial and accounting services tailored to the specific needs of medical professionals. We understand the complexities of your profession and can help you optimise your financial situation.

Read the FAQ

The frequency of your tax payments in Australia depends on various factors, including your income source, business structure, and tax obligations. Here’s a breakdown:
1. Individuals: Most individuals in Australia pay their income tax through the Pay as You Go (PAYG) system, which deducts tax from their wages or salary. This is done on each payday, meaning tax is paid regularly throughout the year. If you have additional income sources, such as investments, you may need to make quarterly or annual payments. At the end of the financial year, you are required to file an annual tax return. You have the option to complete it independently or enlist the services of an accountant, such as Investax Group, to assist in filing your annual tax return.
2. Businesses: Business owners have different tax payment schedules depending on their business structure. If you operate as a sole trader, you will have an annual tax liability, which is typically charged on a quarterly basis through PAYG instalments. On the other hand, if your business operates under a company or trust structure, you will have an annual tax return liability. If your business’s income exceeds $75,000, you will also be required to register for GST, and if you have employees, you must register for PAYG withholding tax. In the case of GST, your tax liability frequency (monthly or quarterly) will be determined by your GST turnover and PAYG withholding tax obligations. Additionally, if your business provides personal benefits to employees, you will be liable for Fringe Benefit Tax (FBT), and an annual FBT return must be submitted each year.
3. Property Owners: If you earn rental income from investment properties, you’ll need to declare this income in your annual tax return.
4. Self-Managed Superannuation Funds (SMSFs): SMSFs generally pay tax on investment income at the concessional rate of 15%. This tax is paid throughout the year, and the fund’s obligations include annual tax returns and potentially quarterly PAYG instalments.
It’s essential to keep accurate records of your income and expenses to ensure you meet your tax obligations promptly and accurately. Consulting with a tax professional like Investax Group can provide personalized guidance on your specific payment schedule and obligations based on your financial situation and business structure.

Read the FAQ

We provide both remote and face-to-face Strategic consultations and tax planning to accommodate your preferences and ensure accessibility.

Read the FAQ

Most of our clients prefer the convenience of electronically submitting their annual tax return information. We have opted not to offer in-person tax return services to ensure the highest quality of service and efficiency for all our clients. You are welcome to visit our office and drop off your tax documents in person if you prefer.

Read the FAQ

While we specialise in property-related tax and accounting expertise, our services extend beyond property owners. We cater to a diverse clientele, including small business owners and professionals aiming to build and manage wealth. Our team has the knowledge and experience to assist a wide range of clients in achieving their financial goals.

Read the FAQ

Yes, we serve both individuals and businesses. Whether you need personal tax return assistance or complex business accounting, we have the expertise to assist you. At Investax, every client, regardless of size, is welcomed as long as you are on the path to wealth creation or have the ambition to build your financial prosperity.

Read the FAQ

We appreciate your interest in our services. At Investax, we understand that pricing transparency is important to our clients. However, as an accounting company, our services are highly tailored to the unique financial circumstances of each client. Therefore, providing a fixed price on our website wouldn’t accurately reflect the individualised nature of our work.
The annual cost estimate for our Tax Return services depends on several factors, such as the number of investment properties you own, the complexity of your share portfolio, recent investment property acquisitions, the presence of discretionary family trusts, hybrid trusts or companies holding assets, and whether you have a business entity. These variables make it challenging to offer a one-size-fits-all pricing structure.
We believe in providing you with a fair and accurate pricing estimate that aligns with your specific needs and goals. To do this, we offer a complimentary consultation lasting 15 minutes, where we can discuss your unique financial situation, requirements, and expectations. During this complimentary consultation, we will provide you with a pricing estimate tailored to your circumstances.
We encourage you to take advantage of this complimentary consultation to better understand how our services can benefit you and obtain a pricing estimate that suits your needs. There’s no obligation, and it’s a great opportunity to get to know us better. Please feel free to reach out to us to schedule your complimentary consultation, and we’ll be happy to assist you further. Your financial success is our priority, and we look forward to working with you to achieve your goals.

Read the FAQ

Investax provides a comprehensive suite of financial services to support your wealth creation journey. This includes personalized Investment and bsuiness Structure planning, tax optimization strategies for individuals, asset protection, retirement planning, estate structuring, and access to a dedicated finance team for loans and financial solutions.

Read the FAQ

Starting your wealth creation journey as an individual employee requires a thoughtful and disciplined approach. Start by establishing specific financial goals, whether it’s saving for retirement, purchasing a home, or creating an emergency fund. Having clear objectives will give you a sense of direction. Next, create a detailed budget that outlines your income, expenses, and savings targets. Explore investment options that align with your risk tolerance and financial goals. Prioritize paying off high-interest debts like credit cards, as they can hinder your wealth creation efforts. Consulting with a financial advisor can provide valuable guidance on investment choices, asset allocation, and long-term financial planning.
For a Business Owner:
Commencing your wealth creation journey as a business owner involves a distinct set of considerations. First and foremost, ensure your business is profitable and well-managed, as it can be a significant source of wealth. It’s essential to maintain clear separation between your personal and business finances to effectively manage both. Collaborate with tax professionals to optimize your tax strategy and leverage deductions and credits available to business owners. Reinvesting profits into your business for growth is a strategic approach to generate more revenue and contribute to your wealth. While your business is a valuable asset, consider diversifying your wealth by investing in opportunities outside of your business.

Read the FAQ

Wealth creation is the process of steadily accumulating financial assets and resources over time with the aim of boosting one’s net worth and attaining financial security and prosperity. It involves strategic tax and financial planning, prudent investments with flexible ownership structure for future exit and tax planning, disciplined savings, and generating income to systematically build and expand one’s wealth.

Read the FAQ

A property accountant is a financial professional with specialized expertise in managing and optimizing property-related financial matters, including tax planning, investment structuring, and financial management for property investors and developers. Investax stands out as your preferred property accountant for several reasons:
1. Comprehensive Services: Investax offers a wide range of services tailored to property investors and developers, including tax advisory, annual tax returns, tax planning, and specialized structuring advice for property-related assets.
2. Geographical Coverage: While based in Sydney, Investax serves clients across Australia, from Queensland’s cray fishing businesses to Melbourne’s major property developers, high net worth individuals Canberra, and Perth. Our virtual face-to-face meetings ensure accessibility no matter where you are in Australia.
3. Asset Protection: Investax specializes in asset protection strategies, helping you safeguard your property investments and assets while optimizing tax efficiency.
4. Retirement Planning: Our dedicated financial advisers provide personalized retirement planning services, ensuring your financial future is secure, whether you’re an individual or business owner.
5. Finance Assistance: Investax has partnered with a dedicated finance team to assist clients with mortgage and business loan needs, providing comprehensive financial support.
6. Client-Centric Approach: We understand the value of quality service and prioritize virtual consultations for your convenience. Investax is committed to providing the highest level of personalized support to help you achieve your property and financial goals.
In summary, a property accountant like Investax specializes in property-related financial matters and offers a comprehensive suite of services, geographical coverage across Australia, asset protection expertise, retirement planning, finance assistance, and a client-centric approach. Investax’s dedication to meeting your specific needs makes us the preferred choice for property accounting services.

Read the FAQ

Investax offers its professional services to clients across Australia. While our main office is located in Sydney, New South Wales, we proudly serve clients from various regions, including Queensland, Victoria, Canberra, and Perth. We understand the importance of convenience and accessibility for our clients, especially in this digital age. As a result, we prioritize virtual face-to-face meetings, ensuring that you can access our high-quality services from the comfort of your location, whether you’re in Brisbane, Melbourne, Canberra, Perth, or elsewhere in Australia.

Read the FAQ

First and foremost, we appreciate your visit to our website and your interest in seeking information. If you wish to refer a family member or friend, please don’t hesitate to send us an email directly to either [email protected] or [email protected]. Alternatively, you can find our contact details on our “Contact Us” page for your convenience.

Read the FAQ

Investax Group boasts over two decades of experience in the industry. Formerly affiliated with Chan and Naylor Group, our decision to chart our own course in the realm of property and small business accounting specialists comes as a result of the founders’ retirement.

Read the FAQ

Investax provides a wealth of resources to assist clients in various aspects of their financial journey. Our website features comprehensive occupation guides tailored to different professions, offering insights and strategies for tax optimization. Additionally, our Investax Insight section boasts a vast library of news articles covering topics such as property investment, asset protection, finance, and financial planning to keep clients informed and up to date. To streamline the tax return process, we offer an annual checklist that clients can use to gather and organize their tax information efficiently. For those seeking a deeper understanding of ownership structures, Investax offers e-books specifically focused on Trust and SMSF structures, allowing clients to learn at their own pace and make informed decisions regarding their financial future.
In addition to our extensive resources, we offer the opportunity for clients to engage in personalized consultations. Through our Complimentary Consultation form, you can easily connect with a relevant expert to address various aspects of your financial and taxation requirements. Whether you’re looking for guidance on property investment, asset protection, finance, or financial planning, our team is here to assist you in achieving your financial goals.

Read the FAQ

Yes, Investax has partnered with a dedicated finance team to offer assistance with mortgage and business loans. Whether you’re purchasing a home, refinancing, or seeking business financing, our partners can provide guidance and access to competitive loan options.

Read the FAQ

Absolutely! Investax has a team of financial advisers dedicated to helping clients with retirement planning. Whether you’re an individual looking to secure your financial future or a business owner planning for retirement, our experts can provide personalized strategies to achieve your retirement goals.

Read the FAQ

Yes, Investax specializes in structuring advice with a focus on both asset protection and estate planning. Our experts can help you create tax-efficient structures that safeguard your assets while ensuring a smooth transition of wealth to future generations.

Read the FAQ

Investax provides a comprehensive range of tax services tailored to various entities, including individuals, businesses, companies, trusts, and Self-Managed Superannuation Funds (SMSFs). Our services encompass annual tax return preparation, tax advisory, tax planning, and specialized tax structuring to help you minimize tax liabilities.

Read the FAQ

Yes, it is possible for a Self-Managed Super Fund (SMSF) to own property jointly with other investors, including related parties. This is a common practice, and there are a few ways it can be structured.

Joint Ownership with Other Investors or Related Parties

An SMSF can hold property assets jointly with other entities such as family trusts, companies, or even the SMSF members personally. Typically, this joint ownership is structured as tenants in common, which means that each party’s ownership interest in the property is distinct and can be clearly identified on the property title.

Important Considerations

  1. Title and Ownership: The property title must clearly state the ownership percentages of each party involved.
  2. Income and Expenses: Income generated from the property and any expenses incurred need to be apportioned according to the ownership percentages of each party.
  3. Tenants in Common Agreement: It is usually recommended to have a formal ‘tenants in common agreement’ in place. This agreement outlines each party’s rights and obligations, ensuring clarity and avoiding potential disputes.

Alternative Ownership Structures

Another way an SMSF can invest in property is through a Unit Trust or Company. In this scenario:

  1. Buying Shares or Units: The SMSF can purchase shares in a related company or units in a related trust.
  2. Property Acquisition: The related entity (trust or company) then uses these funds to acquire the property.
  3. Funding Flexibility: This structure allows other related parties, individuals, or relatives to also buy shares or units in these entities. This collective investment can help fund the property purchase more quickly.
Read the FAQ

Newly constructed property without obtaining an Occupancy Certificate (OC): Renting out a newly built or substantially renovated premises without an occupancy certificate (OC) is generally not permissible. For a property, whether residential or commercial, to be considered ready for use or rental, it must be “lawfully able to be occupied.” This legal occupancy typically is confirmed when an occupancy certificate or a similar approval from the local council is issued.

While there might be brief periods when a property is not available for lease due to minor maintenance or repairs, the fundamental requirement is that the premises must meet all legal and safety standards to be occupied. If a council, relevant authority, or qualified professional deems the property unsafe, it cannot be occupied or rented out.

It’s important to note that the property must adhere to these occupancy standards at all times, whether it’s being leased, hired, licensed, or made available for such arrangements. Compliance with these regulations ensures that the property owner can legally rent out the premises and potentially qualify for certain tax deductions related to the property.

Read the FAQ

It is important to note that the land tax amount is not deductible in the year you pay it. Instead, deductions must be taken in the respective income years to which the land tax liabilities related to. It’s crucial to understand that your liability for land tax is determined by the usage of the property within a given year, regardless of when the tax assessment is actually issued.

When you pay land tax for past years (known as paying “in arrears”), you can’t deduct this payment from your income for the year in which you make the payment. Instead, you can only claim a deduction for the land tax in the years that the tax was originally due for.

For an example – Imagine it’s 2024, and John receives a bill for land tax for the years 2022 and 2023 that he hasn’t paid yet. Even though John pays this bill in 2024, he can’t claim the deduction on his 2024 tax return. Instead, he should claim the deduction for the 2022 land tax on his 2022 tax return, and the deduction for the 2023 land tax on his 2023 tax return, because those are the years the tax relates to, even though he paid it later.

Read the FAQ

You can claim land tax as a tax deduction for your investment properties. However, you cannot claim land tax as an immediate deduction if your property is not generating rental income or if you are using the property for personal use.

Read the FAQ

You are eligible to deduct expenses including interest on loans, local council, water and sewerage rates, land taxes, and emergency services levies incurred during the period of renovating a property intended for rental. It’s important to note, however, that your eligibility for these deductions ceases once your intentions for the property change, such as deciding to use it for personal purposes instead.

Read the FAQ

According to GSTR 2012/6 Airbnb doesn’t fall under commercial residential premises. The definition of ‘commercial residential premises’ in section 195-1 includes the following seven paragraphs, none of which indicate anything similar to Airbnb. This distinction is crucial for understanding the regulatory and tax implications associated with offering or operating Airbnb properties.

  • a hotel, motel, inn, hostel or boarding house. 
  • premises used to provide accommodation in connection with a school; 
  • a ship that is mainly let out on hire in the ordinary course of a business of letting ships out on hire. 
  • a ship that is mainly used for entertainment or transport in the ordinary course of a business of providing ships for entertainment or transport. 
  •  a marina at which one or more of the berths are occupied, or are to be occupied, by ships used as residences. 
  •  a caravan park or a camping ground; or 
  •   anything similar to residential premises described in paragraphs (a) to (e). 

Check out our Comprehensive Guide To Converting Your Long-Term Investment Property To Airbnb Or Short-Term Rental for further information. 

Reference – https://www8.austlii.edu.au/au/other/rulings/ato/ATOGSTR/2012/GSTR20126.pdf

Read the FAQ

The goods and services tax (GST) does not apply to residential rents, so Airbnb hosts do not have to pay it. This also means that you can’t get a GST credit for the costs that go along with it. This is applied even if your sales are more than $75,000, which is the GST threshold.

Please check feel free to check out our Tax Consequence guide for Airbnb. 

Read the FAQ

Incur Stamp Duty: Transferring 100% Property to Partner

Transfers between family members are liable to transfer duty, however some transfers may qualify for an exemption or concession. No transfer/stamp duty is payable where a transfer of residential land is between a married couple, or de facto partners and the property being transferred is either:

  • the family home (principal place of residence)
  • vacant land, which is intended to be used as the site of the family home.

Following the transfer, the property must be jointly owned, with each partner holding an equal 50% share. It’s important to note that a complete transfer of ownership, where 100% of the property is transferred, will incur stamp duty charges.

De facto couples must be living together for at least two years before applying for this exemption.

Read the FAQ

Empty Home Revival: Selling After 6 Years – Unleash CGT

If you are not treating any other property as your Principal Place of Residence (PPOR), you can continue to treat this property as your primary residence indefinitely after you have stopped residing in it.

Read the FAQ

For your investment property, the ability to claim a deduction for repairs and maintenance while the property is not rented hinges on specific circumstances:

  • The property must have been rented out right before the need for repairs arose.
  • The damage necessitating repairs must have happened during a period when the property was generating rental income.

It’s essential to understand that if the property is intended for your personal use following the repairs and maintenance, to be eligible for a deduction, the property should have
produced rental income in the same financial year in which the repair costs were incurred. Thus, the timing of the rental period relative to the repairs is a critical factor for tax
deduction eligibility.

Read the FAQ

When it comes to your investment property, if you find yourself needing to undertake repairs and maintenance tasks straight away after the purchase, it’s
important to understand the tax implications. These immediate repairs, often required due to wear or damage that occurred before you acquired the property, are
classified as ‘initial repairs.’; According to tax regulations, specifically Section 25-10, the costs associated with these initial repairs are deemed capital expenditures. As
such, they do not qualify for immediate tax deductions. Instead, they are capitalised and used to form part of the cost base of the property for capital gains tax purposes
when you sell the property.

Read the FAQ

While you can technically sell a property for $1, several crucial considerations apply. Tax authorities and legal entities typically assess property transactions based on market value, potentially resulting in tax obligations based on the property’s actual worth, despite the nominal sale price. Stamp duty, capital gains tax, and legal and financial implications, particularly if there are existing mortgages or loans, should be thoroughly evaluated.

Read the FAQ

Changing the property investment structure after purchase is possible but can be complex and may have legal and tax implications such as stamp duty and Capital Gain. Consult with legal and Tax experts before making any changes to your property ownership structure.

Read the FAQ

In a property investment partnership, two or more individuals or entities pool their resources to purchase and manage a property. Partnerships can have varying structures, and profits and losses are typically distributed according to the partnership agreement.

Read the FAQ

Trusts offer flexibility in distributing income and can provide tax advantages. For example, discretionary trusts allow income to be distributed among beneficiaries, potentially reducing the overall tax liability. Additionally, trusts are often used for asset protection and estate planning purposes.

Read the FAQ

Purchasing property through a company can provide limited liability, protecting your personal assets from the property’s debts or legal issues.

Read the FAQ

Joint tenants and tenants in common are two common ways to co-own property. Joint tenants have an equal share in the property, and if one owner passes away, their share automatically transfers to the surviving joint tenant(s). In contrast, tenants in common can have unequal shares, and if one owner passes away, their share is passed on according to their will or intestacy laws, not necessarily to the co-owners.

Read the FAQ

Capital gains in Australia are subject to taxation under the Capital Gains Tax (CGT) regime. If you’ve owned the asset for over 12 months, you may qualify for a 50% CGT discount on the gain, with the remaining 50% added to your taxable income and taxed at your marginal rate. Capital losses from other investments can offset capital gains, and any excess losses can be carried forward. There are exemptions for primary residences, concessions for small businesses, and different tax rates for superannuation funds. For accurate guidance in navigating the complexities of CGT, it’s advisable to consult a tax professional or accountant, such as Investax Accountants, as tax laws may change over time.

Read the FAQ

Capital gain is the financial profit realised when you sell or dispose of an asset, such as stocks, real estate, or valuable possessions, for an amount higher than the original purchase price. It represents the difference between the selling price (proceeds) and the cost basis (purchase price and any associated acquisition costs).

Read the FAQ

Yes, obtaining a depreciation schedule can often be worth the cost and effort for several reasons, such as maximise deduction, long term tax benefit for a one-off cost and compliant documentation for audit.

Read the FAQ

To get a depreciation schedule, you typically engage a qualified Quantity Surveyor. They will assess your investment property, identify all depreciable assets within it, and determine their respective values. The Quantity Surveyor will then prepare a detailed report, known as a depreciation schedule, which outlines the deductions you can claim for both Division 40 (Plant and Equipment) and Division 43 (Capital Works).

Read the FAQ

Yes, you can claim deductions for expenses related to repairs and maintenance of your investment property. However, substantial improvements or renovations that enhance the property’s value may need to be depreciated over time, rather than claimed in full as an immediate deduction.

Read the FAQ

If you use a loan to buy an investment property, you can generally claim a deduction for the interest on that loan. However, you need to ensure that the loan is specifically used for the investment property and that you keep proper records to support your claim.

Read the FAQ

CGT is a tax on the profit made from the sale of an asset, including investment properties. If you sell an investment property for more than you paid for it, you may be subject to CGT. However, there are concessions and strategies available to minimize CGT, such as the 50% CGT discount for assets held longer than 12 months and the main residence exemption if the property was your main home for part of the time.

Read the FAQ

As of my last update in September 2021, travel expenses for inspecting your investment property are generally not deductible. However, some limited exceptions may apply, such as if the property is a commercial property.

Read the FAQ

You can claim a range of expenses as deductions, including interest on your investment property loan, property management fees, council rates, property insurance, repairs and maintenance costs, and depreciation on eligible assets within the property.

Read the FAQ

Negative Gearing occurs when the expenses of owning an investment property, including loan interest, exceed the rental income received. This creates a loss, which you can offset against other income to reduce your overall taxable income.

For instance, consider Alex, who purchases an investment property, earning $25,000 annually in rent, but incurs $18,000 in loan interest and $10,000 in other expenses like maintenance and management fees, totalling $28,000 in costs. This scenario leaves Alex with a $3,000 loss due to his expenses exceeding his rental income, a situation known as negative gearing. Alex can then deduct this $3,000 investment property loss from his other taxable income, say a salary of $80,000, effectively reducing it to $77,000 and lowering his overall tax liability.

Read the FAQ

You only need one depreciation schedule per investment property. We encourage our clients to obtain the report soon after the property settlement. If you make significant changes to the property at a later date, the schedule may need to be updated.

Read the FAQ

A depreciation report for an investment property, also known as a tax depreciation schedule, is a comprehensive document that outlines the depreciation allowances a property investor is entitled to claim for the wear and tear of their property and its fixtures over time. It typically includes a forecast, often for up to 40 years, of all depreciable assets, the depreciation methods applicable (prime cost or diminishing value), and the calculated depreciation deductions. This report is used to maximise tax deductions related to the property’s decline in value each financial year and must comply with the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) regulations.

Read the FAQ

o Keep all records from the start, including purchase contracts signed by the vendor, settlement statement, legal fee invoice, stamp duty payment record, Buyer’s Agent fee invoice, loan contract and the loan settlement statement​.
o Keep all the records related to the sale, including signed sale contract, agent fee invoice, settlement statement for the property and the closing statement for your investment loan.

Read the FAQ

You may need to pay capital gains tax and will need records such as the contract of sale, settlement statement, sale of property fees to calculate your capital gain tax.

Read the FAQ

Keep all records from the start, including purchase contracts signed by the vendor, settlement statement, land title deed, legal fee invoice, stamp duty payment record, Buyer’s Agent fee invoice, loan contract/offer and the loan disbursement statement​.

Read the FAQ

No, the current state legislation only covers residential property. Please consult with your accountant before applying this exclusion.

Read the FAQ

Yes, as a foreigner with an investment property in Australia, you are generally required to lodge an Australian tax return. The Australian Taxation Office (ATO) has specific rules and obligations for non-resident property owners. You will need to declare your rental income, and depending on your circumstances, you may be eligible for certain tax deductions related to your property expenses. It’s advisable to consult with a tax professional, such as Investax, or the ATO to ensure you comply with Australian tax laws and benefit from any available tax concessions.

Read the FAQ

The Land Tax Surcharge is an additional tax imposed on foreign persons who own residential land in New South Wales (NSW).

Here are the key details:

  • Applicability:
    • The surcharge is specifically for foreign persons who own residential land in NSW.
    • It is charged in addition to any regular land tax that the property owner may already be paying.
    • Even if a foreign owner does not owe the standard land tax, they may still be required to pay this surcharge.
  • Definition of a Foreign Person:
    • You are generally considered a foreign person unless:
      • You are an Australian citizen, or
      • You have lived in Australia for 200 days or more in the 12 months prior to the taxing date of 31 December and are a permanent resident of Australia.
  • Taxing Date:
    • The surcharge is assessed based on the taxable value of all residential land owned as at 31 December each year.
  • No Tax-Free Threshold:
    • Unlike standard land tax, there is no tax-free threshold for the foreign owner surcharge. This means the surcharge applies to the entire taxable value of the residential land.
  • Surcharge Rate:
    • Starting from the 2023 land tax year, the surcharge rate is 4% of the taxable value of the residential land.

By understanding these points, foreign owners of residential land in NSW can better navigate their tax obligations and ensure compliance with local regulations.

Read the FAQ

It is important to note that the land tax amount is not deductible in the year you pay it. Instead, deductions must be taken in the respective income years to which the land tax liabilities related to. It’s crucial to understand that your liability for land tax is determined by the usage of the property within a given year, regardless of when the tax assessment is actually issued.

When you pay land tax for past years (known as paying “in arrears”), you can’t deduct this payment from your income for the year in which you make the payment. Instead, you can only claim a deduction for the land tax in the years that the tax was originally due for.

For an example – Imagine it’s 2024, and John receives a bill for land tax for the years 2022 and 2023 that he hasn’t paid yet. Even though John pays this bill in 2024, he can’t claim the deduction on his 2024 tax return. Instead, he should claim the deduction for the 2022 land tax on his 2022 tax return, and the deduction for the 2023 land tax on his 2023 tax return, because those are the years the tax relates to, even though he paid it later.

Read the FAQ

You can claim land tax as a tax deduction for your investment properties. However, you cannot claim land tax as an immediate deduction if your property is not generating rental income or if you are using the property for personal use.

Read the FAQ

Home Sale Move: Capital Gains Tax Liability After 6 Months?

If you get a new home before selling your old one, you can actually treat both as your main residence or principal place of residence (PPOR) up to 6 months. 

 

This applies under the following conditions:

 

  1. The old property must have been your main residence continuously for at least 3 months within the 12-month period prior to its sale.
  2. During any period in those 12 months when the old property was not your primary residence, it must not have been used to generate income (so property cannot be rented).
  3. The new property must become your primary residence.

 

This way, you can take your time moving without worrying about the capital gain tax. 

 

Source – Moving to a new main residence  

Read the FAQ

Stamp Duty Impact: Transferring 50% Property to Partner

Transfers between family members are liable to transfer duty, however some transfers may qualify for an exemption or concession. No transfer/stamp duty is payable where a transfer of residential land is between a married couple, or de facto partners and the property being transferred is either:

 

  • the family home (principal place of residence)
  • vacant land, which is intended to be used as the site of the family home.

 

As a result of the transfer, the property must be held equally (50-50) by both partners.

De facto couples must be living together for at least two years before applying for this exemption.

 

Source – Revenue NSW 

Read the FAQ

The main residence exemption under the CGT rules cannot generally apply to properties owned by a trust
The main residence exemption can generally only apply when the dwelling is owned by an individual – refer to section 118-110 ITAA 1997. There are some very limited exceptions to this including:

  • Where the property is held by a special disability trust.
  • Where the property was owned by an individual just before they died and is now held in a deceased estate or testamentary trust, there are some special rules which
    can potentially enable the main residence exemption to apply; or
  • Where the occupier of the property is absolutely entitled to the property as against the trustee.
Read the FAQ

Starting in July 2024, there will be changes to various superannuation rates and caps including the contribution caps. To ensure you have all the necessary updates at your fingertips, we’ve compiled a detailed table outlining the new parameters.

Year Concessional Non-concessional Maximum Bring Forward General Transfer Balance Cap
2024-25 $30,000 $120,000 $360,000 $1,900,000
2023-24 $27,500 $110,000 $330,000 $1,700,000
2021-22 $27,500 $110,000 $330,000 $1,700,000

 

Read the FAQ

The amount you need for a comfortable retirement varies based on factors like your lifestyle, location, and health. A common rule of thumb is to aim for a retirement savings equivalent to 70-90% of your pre-retirement income. However, individual circumstances differ, and it’s essential to assess your specific needs and goals. Working with a financial planner can help you determine an appropriate retirement savings target.

Read the FAQ

Retirement planning involves several key components:

Financial Assessment: Evaluate your current financial situation, including savings, investments, and debts.
Retirement Goals: Define your retirement lifestyle and financial goals, such as travel, healthcare, and living arrangements.
Budgeting: Create a budget that outlines your anticipated retirement expenses and income sources.
Investment Strategy: Develop an investment strategy that aligns with your risk tolerance and long-term financial objectives.
Superannuation and Pension Planning: Explore options for your retirement income, including superannuation, pensions, and other savings vehicles.
Tax Planning: Understand the tax implications of your retirement income and investment choices.
Estate Planning: Consider how you want to distribute your assets and plan for potential healthcare needs.

Read the FAQ

The earlier you start retirement planning, the better. Ideally, it’s best to begin in your 20s or 30s. Starting early allows you to take advantage of compound interest and build a substantial retirement nest egg over time. However, it’s never too late to start planning, even if you’re closer to retirement age. The key is to create a plan that aligns with your current financial situation and goals.

Read the FAQ

Engaging a financial planner for retirement planning is essential due to their expertise in navigating complex financial matters and markets. They create personalized retirement strategies tailored to your unique financial situation, goals, and risk tolerance, ensuring your plan aligns with your desired retirement lifestyle. Financial planners also help manage risks, optimize tax efficiencies, and address estate planning considerations. Their ongoing monitoring and adjustments to your plan adapt to changes in your financial situation and market conditions, providing peace of mind and maximizing your retirement income. With their guidance, you can confidently navigate retirement complexities and make informed financial decisions to secure a comfortable retirement.

Read the FAQ

Retirement planning is the process of setting financial and lifestyle goals for your retirement years and creating a strategy to achieve them. It’s important because it ensures you have the financial resources and plans in place to maintain your desired lifestyle and cover expenses after you stop working. Proper retirement planning can help you avoid financial stress during retirement and make the most of your post-work years.

Read the FAQ

Distinguishing between an employee and an independent contractor is vital for compliance with tax and superannuation laws. A simple contract label is not enough; the actual work relationship and duties performed are what define the status. Below, we outline the key differences to help you understand where you or your workers may stand. Just because an agreement states that a worker is an independent contractor, this does not mean that they are a contractor for tax and superannuation purposes, new guidance from the ATO warns. 

Where there is a written contract, the rights and obligations of the contract need to support that an independent contracting relationship exists. The fact that a contractor has an ABN does not necessarily mean that they have genuinely been engaged as a contractor. The ATO mentions – 

“at its core, the distinction between an employee and an independent contractor is that:

  • an employee serves in the business of an employer, performing their work as a part of that business.
  • an independent contractor provides services to a principal’s business, but the contractor does so in furthering their own business enterprise; they carry out the work as principal of their own business, not part of another.”

Here are the basic differences as pointed out by the ATO:

Employee Independent contractor
Control: your business has the legal right to control how, where and when the worker does their work. Control: the worker can choose how, where and when their work is done, subject to reasonable direction by you.
Integration: the worker serves in your business. They are contractually required to perform work as a representative of your business. Integration: the worker provides services to your business. The worker performs work to further their own business. 
Mode of remuneration: the worker is paid either:

1. for the time worked,
2. a price per item or activity,
3. a commission.

Mode of remuneration: the worker is generally contracted to achieve a specific result, and is paid when they have completed that result, often for a fixed fee.
Ability to subcontract or delegate:

there is no clause in the contract allowing the worker to delegate or subcontract their work to others. The worker must perform the work themselves and can’t pay someone else to do the work for them.

Ability to subcontract or delegate:

there is a clause in the contract allowing the worker the right to delegate or subcontract their work to others. The clause must not be a sham and must be legally capable of exercise.

Provision of tools and equipment: your business provides all or most of the equipment, tools and other assets required to complete the work; or the worker provides all or most of the tools, but your business provides them with an allowance or reimburses them for expenses incurred. Provision of tools and equipment: the worker provides all or most of the equipment, tools and other assets required to complete the work, and you do not give them an allowance or reimbursement for the expenses incurred.
The work involves the use of a substantial item that your worker is wholly responsible for.
Risk: the worker bears little or no risk. Your business bears the commercial risk for any costs arising out of injury or defect in their work. Risk: the worker bears the commercial risk for any costs arising out of injury or defect in their work.
Generation of goodwill: your business benefits from any goodwill arising from the work of the worker. Generation of goodwill: the contractor’s business benefits from any goodwill generated from their work, not your business.

 

Reference: https://www.ato.gov.au/businesses-and-organisations/hiring-and-paying-your-workers/employee-or-independent-contractor/difference-between-employees-and-independent-contractors#ato-Employeeorindependentcontractor 

Read the FAQ

Empower Your Quest: CGT Concession in Small Business

You are considered a CGT Concession Stakeholder in a company or trust if you are:

  • A significant individual in that company or trust.
  • The spouse of a significant individual and have a small but more than zero percent stake in the company or trust.

You can own this stake either directly or through other entities. To calculate your stake, use the same method as the significant individual test.

You’re a significant individual in a company or trust if you own at least 20% of it. This 20% can include both your direct ownership and indirect ownership through other entities.

Special Note – A spouse of a significant individual must have a participation percentage greater than zero in the business entity.

Read the FAQ

Small Business CGT Concession and Roll-Over Rules:

CGT Event J5 occurs if, after choosing a roll-over for a capital gain, you haven’t acquired a new asset or improved an existing one by the end of the allotted time. Additionally, this event happens if:

  • The new or improved asset isn’t actively used in your business anymore (like if you’ve sold it, it’s now part of your trading stock, or it’s no longer used in your business operations).
  • If the new asset is a share in a company or a trust interest, and it fails the 80% test (unless this failure is only temporary).
  • You or a related entity aren’t significant stakeholders in the company or trust.
  • The stakeholders in the company or trust don’t have a significant (at least 90%) investment in your business. When CGT Event J5 happens, you’ll have to recognize a capital gain. This is the same amount you initially didn’t have to pay tax on because of the small business roll-over. The capital gain is counted at the end of the time you were supposed to get or improve the asset.

Example: CGT event J5
In September 2020, Luke made a capital gain of $80,000 on an active asset. He met the maximum net asset value test.

Luke disregarded the whole capital gain under the small business roll-over.

In September 2022 (the end of the 2-year period), Luke did not have any replacement or capital improved assets. CGT event J5 happens, and Luke makes a capital gain of $80,000 in September 2022.

Source – ATO/ Small Business Rollover

Read the FAQ

For comprehensive information and expert guidance on Division 7A, we recommend reaching out to Investax accountants. We specialise in taxation matters and can provide you with the most up-to-date and tailored advice to ensure compliance with Division 7A rules. You can also visit the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) website for additional resources and information, but consulting with an Investax accountant can offer you personalised guidance specific to your situation.

Read the FAQ

To avoid Division 7A implications, private companies should ensure that loans and financial arrangements with shareholders or associates are structured in accordance with the Div 7A loan requirements. You can take out dividends and wages to avoid Div 7A Loan.

Read the FAQ

A Division 7A loan refers to a loan or financial arrangement made by a private company to a shareholder or their associate, where the terms and conditions of the loan are not at arm’s length or are less favourable than what would be available in a commercial transaction. Such loans are subject to Division 7A rules.

Read the FAQ

Accounting software streamlines financial tasks, automates processes, and enhances accuracy. It helps businesses manage invoicing, expense tracking, payroll, and financial reporting more efficiently.

Read the FAQ

Accurate and up-to-date records are essential for effective tax reporting and compliance. It enables you to track income, expenses, and financial transactions, making it easier to report to the ATO accurately. Good record-keeping also helps you identify potential discrepancies, support your claims, and demonstrate your business’s financial position.

Read the FAQ

If your small business has an aggregated turnover of less than $10 million (since 1 July 2016), you are generally eligible to use the simplified depreciation rules. However, eligibility criteria and thresholds can vary based on the financial year and specific circumstances.

Read the FAQ

The instant asset write-off allows eligible small businesses to immediately deduct the cost of eligible assets up to a certain threshold. This deduction is claimed in the year the asset is first used or installed ready for use. It allows businesses to reduce their taxable income by deducting the cost of assets such as equipment, vehicles, and machinery.

Read the FAQ

The simplified depreciation method is a streamlined approach designed for small businesses in Australia. It includes an instant asset write-off for eligible assets and a general small business pool for assets that don’t qualify for immediate deduction. This method simplifies the calculation of depreciation deductions, reducing administrative complexity for small business owners.

Read the FAQ

In Australia, a small business for tax purposes, is generally defined as one with an annual turnover of less than $10 million. This threshold applies to various tax concessions and benefits, including the Small Business Income Tax Offset, simplified depreciation rules, and the Small Business Capital Gains Tax concessions.

Read the FAQ

To ensure valid deductions, make sure that your claimed expenses are directly related to your business operations. Keep all necessary evidence, such as receipts, invoices, and documentation, to support your claims. Consulting your tax professional can help you determine which deductions are eligible and provide guidance on proper documentation.

Read the FAQ

Yes, it is possible for a Self-Managed Super Fund (SMSF) to own property jointly with other investors, including related parties. This is a common practice, and there are a few ways it can be structured.

Joint Ownership with Other Investors or Related Parties

An SMSF can hold property assets jointly with other entities such as family trusts, companies, or even the SMSF members personally. Typically, this joint ownership is structured as tenants in common, which means that each party’s ownership interest in the property is distinct and can be clearly identified on the property title.

Important Considerations

  1. Title and Ownership: The property title must clearly state the ownership percentages of each party involved.
  2. Income and Expenses: Income generated from the property and any expenses incurred need to be apportioned according to the ownership percentages of each party.
  3. Tenants in Common Agreement: It is usually recommended to have a formal ‘tenants in common agreement’ in place. This agreement outlines each party’s rights and obligations, ensuring clarity and avoiding potential disputes.

Alternative Ownership Structures

Another way an SMSF can invest in property is through a Unit Trust or Company. In this scenario:

  1. Buying Shares or Units: The SMSF can purchase shares in a related company or units in a related trust.
  2. Property Acquisition: The related entity (trust or company) then uses these funds to acquire the property.
  3. Funding Flexibility: This structure allows other related parties, individuals, or relatives to also buy shares or units in these entities. This collective investment can help fund the property purchase more quickly.
Read the FAQ

We get this question quite often: When can I access my super? Generally, access to your super is possible only if:

  • You retire and are 60 or older; or
  • You turn 65 (regardless of whether you’re still working).

Early access to superannuation is possible only under very limited circumstances such as terminal illness, permanent incapacity, and severe financial hardship, and there are very strict protocols to follow before any funds are paid out.

When you have a Self-Managed Super Fund (SMSF), members have full access to the superfund, and it can sometimes become tempting for members to access these funds during a financial crisis. If you access your superannuation simply due to financial strains without meeting the early access requirements, the transaction becomes illegal.

There are two common ways illegal early access occurs:

  • When the trustees (or their business) are in financial distress, and they use the superannuation account for a short-term loan; or
  • A promoter offers access through a scheme—often getting people to establish an SMSF and roll over their superannuation into the SMSF.
Read the FAQ

In the context of a Self-Managed Super Fund (SMSF), a “related party” encompasses a broad range of individuals and entities that have a close association with the members of the SMSF. The definition of a related party for an SMSF, as outlined by the Australian Taxation Office (ATO), includes:

  1. Members of the SMSF: Every individual who is a member of the Self-Managed Super Fund.
  2. Relatives of Members: This includes a wide array of family relations such as spouses, parents, grandparents, children, grandchildren, siblings, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, and the equivalent relations by marriage or de facto partnerships.
  3. Standard Employer-Sponsors: An employer who contributes to the SMSF for a member under an arrangement between the employer and the trustees of the fund.
  4. Partnerships: Where a member or a relative of a member is a partner.
  5. Trusts: Where a member or a relative of a member controls the trust.
  6. Companies: Where a member or a relative of a member has a significant influence over the company, typically through a substantial shareholding.

The rules around related parties in a Self-Managed Superfund (SMSF) are designed to safeguard the superannuation system.  Essentially, these rules make sure that SMSFs are always working to help members reach their retirement goals, keeping everything fair and above board.

Source – ATO 

Read the FAQ

An in-house asset for a Self-Managed Superfund (SMSF) typically refers to an investment or asset that is related to, or involves, a member of the SMSF or their related parties. According to the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) regulations, an in-house asset can be:

  • a loan to, or an investment in, a related party of your fund
  • an investment in a related trust of your fund
  • an asset of your fund that is leased to a related party.

The ATO instructs that in-house assets must not exceed 5% of the total market value of the Self-Managed Super Fund’s (SMSF) assets.

This rule is designed to ensure that SMSFs are primarily used for the purpose of providing retirement benefits to their members, and to prevent the misuse of superannuation funds for personal or related party financial dealings. Therefore, the investments and transactions made by an SMSF need to comply with this rule, among others, to meet the sole purpose test and ensure the fund is being used appropriately for retirement savings.

Source – ATO 

Read the FAQ

In the context of a Self-Managed Super Fund (SMSF), a “related party” encompasses a broad range of individuals and entities that have a close association with the members of the SMSF. The definition of a related party for an SMSF, as outlined by the Australian Taxation Office (ATO), includes:

  1. Members of the SMSF: Every individual who is a member of the Self-Managed Super Fund.
  2. Relatives of Members: This includes a wide array of family relations such as spouses, parents, grandparents, children, grandchildren, siblings, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, and the equivalent relations by marriage or de facto partnerships.
  3. Standard Employer-Sponsors: An employer who contributes to the SMSF for a member under an arrangement between the employer and the trustees of the fund.
  4. Partnerships: Where a member or a relative of a member is a partner.
  5. Trusts: Where a member or a relative of a member controls the trust.
  6. Companies: Where a member or a relative of a member has a significant influence over the company, typically through a substantial shareholding.

The rules around related parties in a Self-Managed Superfund (SMSF) are designed to safeguard the superannuation system.  Essentially, these rules make sure that SMSFs are always working to help members reach their retirement goals, keeping everything fair and above board.

Source – ATO

Read the FAQ

An in-house asset for a Self-Managed Superfund (SMSF) typically refers to an investment or asset that is related to, or involves, a member of the SMSF or their related parties. According to the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) regulations, an in-house asset can be:

  • a loan to, or an investment in, a related party of your fund
  • an investment in a related trust of your fund
  • an asset of your fund that is leased to a related party.

The ATO instructs that in-house assets must not exceed 5% of the total market value of the Self-Managed Super Fund’s (SMSF) assets.

This rule is designed to ensure that SMSFs are primarily used for the purpose of providing retirement benefits to their members, and to prevent the misuse of superannuation funds for personal or related party financial dealings. Therefore, the investments and transactions made by an SMSF need to comply with this rule, among others, to meet the sole purpose test and ensure the fund is being used appropriately for retirement savings.

Source – ATO 

Read the FAQ

Reclaim Excess Funds: SMSF Overpayment Withdrawal

Contributions generally cannot be returned to a member because:

  • they regret making the contribution.
  • they or their agents made an error in their decision to contribute.

Contributions may only be refunded in circumstances tightly prescribed by legislation.

Read the FAQ

In the context of your Self-Managed Superfund (SMSF), your transfer balance cap represents the upper limit on the total amount of accumulated superannuation funds you
can move into retirement phase accounts, which enjoy tax-free earnings. This cap is not a one-time figure; it’s a lifetime limit that applies to all transfers you make over the course of
your life into retirement phase pensions.

With the commencement of your retirement phase income stream within your SMSF, your personal transfer balance cap will be equivalent to the prevailing general transfer balance
cap at that juncture.

Please note that since the 1st of July 2021, the general transfer balance cap is indexed with inflation, tracked by the consumer price index, and is adjusted in $100,000 increments. This
indexation can potentially increase your transfer balance cap over time, enhancing the amount you can shift into your SMSF retirement phase account, thereby maximizing your
superannuation’s tax-effective potential.

Source: ATO – Transfer Balance Cap Explanation

Read the FAQ

A Limited Recourse Borrowing Arrangement (LRBA) in a Self-Managed Superannuation Fund (SMSF) is a financial structure that enables the SMSF to borrow funds to acquire assets, typically property. The primary motivation behind using an LRBA in your SMSF is to expand your investment portfolio and accumulate wealth for retirement. Through LRBA, your SMSF can diversify its investments, particularly into property, which may be otherwise unaffordable without borrowed funds. This strategy potentially offers rental income and capital growth as part of your retirement savings. Additionally, it can provide tax advantages, although it comes with complexities and risks. Assets acquired through LRBA are held in a separate Bare Trust structure, ensuring compliance with superannuation laws and protecting other SMSF assets from legal claims. However, navigating this strategy requires careful consideration of loan terms, interest rates, and compliance rules, making it crucial to seek guidance from SMSF and LRBA experts to use LRBA effectively and within legal boundaries.

Read the FAQ

A Bare Trust is a crucial element of many SMSF property investments, primarily because it ensures compliance with superannuation laws, such as the “sole purpose test.” This legal requirement mandates that superannuation funds exist primarily to provide retirement benefits to members. By using a Bare Trust, you separate the legal ownership of the property from the SMSF trustee, reducing compliance risks and protecting assets. The Bare Trustee holds legal ownership but has limited powers and must follow the SMSF trustee’s instructions, minimizing their involvement and liability.

Read the FAQ

An SMSF can be beneficial for several reasons, including unique features that set it apart from other superannuation structures:

  • Control: An SMSF provides you with greater control over your retirement savings, allowing you to make investment decisions that align with your financial goals and risk tolerance.
  • Tailored Investments: You have the flexibility to invest in a wide range of assets, including property, shares, cash, and other investments, enabling you to diversify your portfolio.
  • Cost Efficiency: For some individuals, an SMSF can be more cost-effective than retail superannuation funds, especially when the fund balance grows.
  • Estate Planning: SMSFs offer estate planning options, including the ability to nominate beneficiaries and create a comprehensive strategy for the distribution of assets upon your passing.
  • Tax Benefits: Depending on your circumstances, an SMSF can provide tax advantages, including potentially lower tax rates on investment income and capital gains.
  • Asset Protection: In certain situations, SMSFs can offer additional asset protection benefits, although these should not be the primary reason for establishing one.
  • Property Investment: An important distinction of SMSFs is the ability to use Limited Recourse Borrowing Arrangements (LRBA) to purchase property. This means an SMSF can borrow money to buy property, making it the only superannuation structure where this option is available. LRBA allows you to leverage your superannuation to invest in property, potentially accelerating wealth growth within your fund.
Read the FAQ

An SMSF is a private superannuation fund that individuals manage themselves. It allows members to have control over their retirement savings, make investment decisions, and manage compliance with superannuation laws. SMSFs are regulated by the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) and are subject to specific rules and regulations.

Read the FAQ

Borrowing within an SMSF for property investment, known as a Limited Recourse Borrowing Arrangement (LRBA), comes with several risks, including:

• Higher Costs: SMSF property loans can be more expensive than other property loans.
• Cash Flow: Ensuring your fund has enough liquidity to cover expenses, including loan repayments and property-related costs.
• Loan Balance: Planning for loan repayment in the event of member illness, disability, death, or rental vacancy.
• Unwinding Challenges: Difficulty in reversing the arrangement if loan documents aren’t correctly structured, potentially resulting in substantial losses.
• Tax Limitations: You cannot offset tax losses from the property against your taxable income outside the fund.
• Alteration Restrictions: Significant property alterations are restricted until the SMSF property loan is fully repaid.

Read the FAQ

When investing in property through a Self-Managed Super Fund (SMSF), you must adhere to several crucial rules:
• The property’s primary purpose should be to provide retirement benefits to fund members (Sole Purpose Test).
• You cannot acquire property from a related party of a fund member.
• The property cannot be lived in by a fund member or their related parties.
• Renting the property to a fund member or their related parties is also not allowed.

Read the FAQ

Yes, it is possible for a Self-Managed Super Fund (SMSF) to own property jointly with other investors, including related parties. This is a common practice, and there are a few ways it can be structured.

Joint Ownership with Other Investors or Related Parties

An SMSF can hold property assets jointly with other entities such as family trusts, companies, or even the SMSF members personally. Typically, this joint ownership is structured as tenants in common, which means that each party’s ownership interest in the property is distinct and can be clearly identified on the property title.

Important Considerations

  1. Title and Ownership: The property title must clearly state the ownership percentages of each party involved.
  2. Income and Expenses: Income generated from the property and any expenses incurred need to be apportioned according to the ownership percentages of each party.
  3. Tenants in Common Agreement: It is usually recommended to have a formal ‘tenants in common agreement’ in place. This agreement outlines each party’s rights and obligations, ensuring clarity and avoiding potential disputes.

Alternative Ownership Structures

Another way an SMSF can invest in property is through a Unit Trust or Company. In this scenario:

  1. Buying Shares or Units: The SMSF can purchase shares in a related company or units in a related trust.
  2. Property Acquisition: The related entity (trust or company) then uses these funds to acquire the property.
  3. Funding Flexibility: This structure allows other related parties, individuals, or relatives to also buy shares or units in these entities. This collective investment can help fund the property purchase more quickly.
Read the FAQ

Starting in July 2024, there will be changes to various superannuation rates and caps including the contribution caps. To ensure you have all the necessary updates at your fingertips, we’ve compiled a detailed table outlining the new parameters.

Year Concessional Non-concessional Maximum Bring Forward General Transfer Balance Cap
2024-25 $30,000 $120,000 $360,000 $1,900,000
2023-24 $27,500 $110,000 $330,000 $1,700,000
2021-22 $27,500 $110,000 $330,000 $1,700,000

 

Read the FAQ

In the context of a Self-Managed Super Fund (SMSF), a “related party” encompasses a broad range of individuals and entities that have a close association with the members of the SMSF. The definition of a related party for an SMSF, as outlined by the Australian Taxation Office (ATO), includes:

  1. Members of the SMSF: Every individual who is a member of the Self-Managed Super Fund.
  2. Relatives of Members: This includes a wide array of family relations such as spouses, parents, grandparents, children, grandchildren, siblings, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, and the equivalent relations by marriage or de facto partnerships.
  3. Standard Employer-Sponsors: An employer who contributes to the SMSF for a member under an arrangement between the employer and the trustees of the fund.
  4. Partnerships: Where a member or a relative of a member is a partner.
  5. Trusts: Where a member or a relative of a member controls the trust.
  6. Companies: Where a member or a relative of a member has a significant influence over the company, typically through a substantial shareholding.

The rules around related parties in a Self-Managed Superfund (SMSF) are designed to safeguard the superannuation system.  Essentially, these rules make sure that SMSFs are always working to help members reach their retirement goals, keeping everything fair and above board.

Source – ATO 

Read the FAQ

An in-house asset for a Self-Managed Superfund (SMSF) typically refers to an investment or asset that is related to, or involves, a member of the SMSF or their related parties. According to the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) regulations, an in-house asset can be:

  • a loan to, or an investment in, a related party of your fund
  • an investment in a related trust of your fund
  • an asset of your fund that is leased to a related party.

The ATO instructs that in-house assets must not exceed 5% of the total market value of the Self-Managed Super Fund’s (SMSF) assets.

This rule is designed to ensure that SMSFs are primarily used for the purpose of providing retirement benefits to their members, and to prevent the misuse of superannuation funds for personal or related party financial dealings. Therefore, the investments and transactions made by an SMSF need to comply with this rule, among others, to meet the sole purpose test and ensure the fund is being used appropriately for retirement savings.

Source – ATO 

Read the FAQ

In the context of a Self-Managed Super Fund (SMSF), a “related party” encompasses a broad range of individuals and entities that have a close association with the members of the SMSF. The definition of a related party for an SMSF, as outlined by the Australian Taxation Office (ATO), includes:

  1. Members of the SMSF: Every individual who is a member of the Self-Managed Super Fund.
  2. Relatives of Members: This includes a wide array of family relations such as spouses, parents, grandparents, children, grandchildren, siblings, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, and the equivalent relations by marriage or de facto partnerships.
  3. Standard Employer-Sponsors: An employer who contributes to the SMSF for a member under an arrangement between the employer and the trustees of the fund.
  4. Partnerships: Where a member or a relative of a member is a partner.
  5. Trusts: Where a member or a relative of a member controls the trust.
  6. Companies: Where a member or a relative of a member has a significant influence over the company, typically through a substantial shareholding.

The rules around related parties in a Self-Managed Superfund (SMSF) are designed to safeguard the superannuation system.  Essentially, these rules make sure that SMSFs are always working to help members reach their retirement goals, keeping everything fair and above board.

Source – ATO

Read the FAQ

An in-house asset for a Self-Managed Superfund (SMSF) typically refers to an investment or asset that is related to, or involves, a member of the SMSF or their related parties. According to the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) regulations, an in-house asset can be:

  • a loan to, or an investment in, a related party of your fund
  • an investment in a related trust of your fund
  • an asset of your fund that is leased to a related party.

The ATO instructs that in-house assets must not exceed 5% of the total market value of the Self-Managed Super Fund’s (SMSF) assets.

This rule is designed to ensure that SMSFs are primarily used for the purpose of providing retirement benefits to their members, and to prevent the misuse of superannuation funds for personal or related party financial dealings. Therefore, the investments and transactions made by an SMSF need to comply with this rule, among others, to meet the sole purpose test and ensure the fund is being used appropriately for retirement savings.

Source – ATO 

Read the FAQ

Tax Benefits of an ABP

Typically, any investment income or capital gains accumulated in a pension account, such as an Account-Based Pension (ABP), are not subject to tax. This means that the returns generated from the assets within the ABP are tax-free.

However, it’s important to understand that there are exceptions. Certain types of income, including taxable contributions and dividends from some private companies, remain taxable even when they are earned through a pension fund.

Read the FAQ

General Transfer Balance Cap in 2024

General Transfer Balance Cap

Source: ATO/General Transfer Balance Cap

Read the FAQ

In most cases, a Bare Trust itself does not generate income or require the lodgement of a separate tax return. Instead, the income and tax obligations associated with the assets held in the Bare Trust are attributed to the beneficiary of the trust. The beneficiary is responsible for including any income earned from the trust’s assets in their own tax return. It’s essential to consult with a tax professional or legal advisor to ensure compliance with tax regulations and understand any specific reporting requirements related to the Bare Trust.

Read the FAQ

The tax treatment of SMSF pension payments depends on various factors, including the member’s age and the components of the pension payment. Generally, pension payments received by members aged 60 and over are tax-free. Members aged between their preservation age and 59 receive a tax offset on their pension payments. However, tax may apply to certain components of the pension, such as taxable elements in the payment.

Read the FAQ

The age requirement to start an SMSF pension depends on the type of pension. For an account-based pension, the member must have reached their preservation age, which is currently between 55 and 60, depending on the member’s birthdate. For a transition to retirement income stream (TRIS), the member can commence the pension once they reach their preservation age, even if they are still working.

Read the FAQ

When engaging an auditor to review an LRBA within your Self-Managed Superannuation Fund (SMSF), you should provide a comprehensive set of documents for examination. The exact requirements may vary depending on your specific LRBA and fund’s circumstances, but generally, you should include: Loan Agreement, Bare Trust Deed, property title deed, current market value of the property, lease agreement etc.

Read the FAQ

An SMSF must undergo an annual audit by an independent auditor. This audit is conducted at the end of each financial year and is a mandatory requirement to ensure compliance with superannuation laws and regulations.

Read the FAQ

An SMSF audit is a comprehensive review of the fund’s financial records, transactions, and compliance with superannuation laws. Key components include verifying the fund’s financial statements, assessing investment strategies, confirming contributions and benefit payments, checking for compliance with regulatory limits, and ensuring proper record-keeping. The audit also examines the fund’s compliance with the sole purpose test, the in-house asset rules, and other legal requirements.

Read the FAQ

The deadline for lodging an SMSF tax return is typically 28 February following the end of the financial year. However, SMSFs with a registered tax agent may have extended deadlines, which can vary. It’s essential to consult with your tax agent and ensure timely submission to avoid penalties.

Read the FAQ

Yes, an SMSF (Self-Managed Superannuation Fund) is required to lodge an annual tax return with the Australian Taxation Office (ATO). The tax return for an SMSF is known as the Self-Managed Superannuation Fund Annual Return (SMSFAR) and is submitted to report the fund’s financial activities, income, expenses, contributions, and deductions. It is an essential compliance requirement, and failure to lodge the annual tax return on time can result in penalties and the potential loss of tax concessions. SMSFs must also undergo an annual audit by an independent auditor as part of the compliance process.

Read the FAQ

A Taxable Payments Annual Report (TPAR) is a report that certain businesses need to lodge with the ATO. It includes details of payments made to contractors for services provided. Industries such as construction, cleaning, and courier services are required to lodge a TPAR.

Read the FAQ

Our expertise in Self-Managed Superfund (SMSF) Tax Returns is a cornerstone of our services. We maintain a dedicated team of professionals specialising in SMSF taxation matters, well-versed in the unique tax rules and regulations governing SMSFs. Beyond tax returns, our comprehensive SMSF knowledge extends to accounting, auditing, and financial statement preparation to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements. We remain up to date with evolving SMSF legislation, providing proactive tax planning to optimise your fund’s financial outcomes while offering transparent and efficient service throughout the process. Our tailored SMSF strategies are designed to align with your specific circumstances and investment goals, making the SMSF tax return process seamless and effective.
Moreover, we utilize state-of-the-art software, such as Class Super, which automatically feeds all your share transactions into the system, ensuring seamless SMSF tax return and audit processes. Notably, this technology eliminates the need for you to incur additional expenses for providing annual market valuations of SMSF properties, as our software provides this crucial information, further streamlining the SMSF management process. Our goal is to offer a comprehensive SMSF solution that combines professional expertise with cutting-edge tools, making your SMSF management as efficient and hassle-free as possible.

Read the FAQ

Distinguishing between an employee and an independent contractor is vital for compliance with tax and superannuation laws. A simple contract label is not enough; the actual work relationship and duties performed are what define the status. Below, we outline the key differences to help you understand where you or your workers may stand. Just because an agreement states that a worker is an independent contractor, this does not mean that they are a contractor for tax and superannuation purposes, new guidance from the ATO warns. 

Where there is a written contract, the rights and obligations of the contract need to support that an independent contracting relationship exists. The fact that a contractor has an ABN does not necessarily mean that they have genuinely been engaged as a contractor. The ATO mentions – 

“at its core, the distinction between an employee and an independent contractor is that:

  • an employee serves in the business of an employer, performing their work as a part of that business.
  • an independent contractor provides services to a principal’s business, but the contractor does so in furthering their own business enterprise; they carry out the work as principal of their own business, not part of another.”

Here are the basic differences as pointed out by the ATO:

Employee Independent contractor
Control: your business has the legal right to control how, where and when the worker does their work. Control: the worker can choose how, where and when their work is done, subject to reasonable direction by you.
Integration: the worker serves in your business. They are contractually required to perform work as a representative of your business. Integration: the worker provides services to your business. The worker performs work to further their own business. 
Mode of remuneration: the worker is paid either:

1. for the time worked,
2. a price per item or activity,
3. a commission.

Mode of remuneration: the worker is generally contracted to achieve a specific result, and is paid when they have completed that result, often for a fixed fee.
Ability to subcontract or delegate:

there is no clause in the contract allowing the worker to delegate or subcontract their work to others. The worker must perform the work themselves and can’t pay someone else to do the work for them.

Ability to subcontract or delegate:

there is a clause in the contract allowing the worker the right to delegate or subcontract their work to others. The clause must not be a sham and must be legally capable of exercise.

Provision of tools and equipment: your business provides all or most of the equipment, tools and other assets required to complete the work; or the worker provides all or most of the tools, but your business provides them with an allowance or reimburses them for expenses incurred. Provision of tools and equipment: the worker provides all or most of the equipment, tools and other assets required to complete the work, and you do not give them an allowance or reimbursement for the expenses incurred.
The work involves the use of a substantial item that your worker is wholly responsible for.
Risk: the worker bears little or no risk. Your business bears the commercial risk for any costs arising out of injury or defect in their work. Risk: the worker bears the commercial risk for any costs arising out of injury or defect in their work.
Generation of goodwill: your business benefits from any goodwill arising from the work of the worker. Generation of goodwill: the contractor’s business benefits from any goodwill generated from their work, not your business.

 

Reference: https://www.ato.gov.au/businesses-and-organisations/hiring-and-paying-your-workers/employee-or-independent-contractor/difference-between-employees-and-independent-contractors#ato-Employeeorindependentcontractor 

Read the FAQ

Funding options include personal savings, loans, grants, venture capital, angel investors, crowdfunding, and government programs like the Entrepreneurs’ Program.

Read the FAQ

Yes, there are grants and incentives for start-ups, including the Research and Development (R&D) Tax Incentive, Export Market Development Grants (EMDG), and the Entrepreneurs’ Program.

Read the FAQ

While not mandatory, a business plan is highly recommended. It helps outline your business strategy, market analysis, financial projections, and goals.

Read the FAQ

Start-ups need to consider taxes like Goods and Services Tax (GST), income tax, and payroll tax. GST is usually compulsory for businesses earning over $75,000 per year.

Read the FAQ

Yes, most businesses in Australia require an ABN. It simplifies tax and business dealings. You can apply for an ABN online through the Australian Business Register (ABR) website.

Read the FAQ

Protect IP through trademarks, patents, copyrights, and confidentiality agreements. Consult an IP lawyer for advice.

Read the FAQ

Registering a trademark provides legal protection and exclusive rights to use that mark for your goods or services. It helps prevent others from using a similar mark, which can protect your brand identity and reputation.

Read the FAQ

Yes, it’s advisable to have a separate business bank account for financial transparency and to manage business transactions effectively.

Read the FAQ

The first step is to choose a suitable business structure, such as a sole trader, partnership, company, or trust. Register your business name and obtain any required licenses or permits.

Read the FAQ

Many small to medium-sized business owners ponder the complexity of offering employee benefits such as gym memberships. Apart from keeping employees happy and motivated to work for the business, it can create certain tax liabilities that may be viewed as a benefit for your business. Offering gym memberships to your employees falls under the category of an Entertainment Fringe Benefit. If the annual cost of the gym membership exceeds the minor benefit exemption amount, which is $300 or more per employee, you will need to apply the Fringe Benefit Tax.

Tax Outcome 

  • Report Fringe Benefit in the FBT Return 
  • Report FBT in Employees PAYG payment Summary report. 

Tax Benefit

The business can claim:

  • An income tax deduction and GST credits for the cost of gym memberships 
  • An income tax deduction for the Fringe Benefit Tax (FBT) paid. 
Read the FAQ

If you miss the due dates for super payments, you could face penalties and consequences. The Australian Taxation Office (ATO) takes non-compliance with super obligations seriously.

Read the FAQ

Super contributions for your employees must be paid by the 28th day following the end of each quarter. The due dates are January 28, April 28, July 28, and October 28.

Read the FAQ

Reporting through STP is integrated into your regular payroll process. You need to use payroll software that is STP-enabled to send the required information to the ATO each time you process payroll. The software will generate and send the necessary reports directly to the ATO.

Read the FAQ

All employers, regardless of their business size, are required to use Single Touch Payroll to report their employees’ salary, wages, PAYG withholding, and superannuation contributions to the ATO. This includes businesses, not-for-profit organisations, and government entities.

Read the FAQ

FBT is calculated based on the taxable value of the fringe benefits provided. Employers are required to report and pay FBT annually on their FBT return, which is usually lodged by 21 May each year.

Read the FAQ

An Instalment Activity Statement (IAS) is used by businesses to report and pay their Pay as You Go (PAYG) income tax instalments, Goods and Services Tax (GST) instalments, and other tax liabilities more frequently than the BAS. It’s often used by businesses that do not have a GST turnover.

Read the FAQ

The frequency of lodging a BAS depends on the size and turnover of the business. Generally, businesses lodge their BAS monthly or quarterly. However, there are also options for annual lodgement for certain small businesses.

Read the FAQ

To maximize tax benefits in Testamentary Trust, individuals should:

Structure the trust to legally reduce generational wealth taxes.

  • Structure the trust to legally reduce generational wealth taxes.
  • Carefully select beneficiaries to optimise capital gains tax distribution.
  • Work with an accountant well-versed in trust tax outcomes.
Read the FAQ

Maximizing Centrelink Benefits: Testamentary Trust Impact

If a beneficiary has control over the trust, Centrelink may consider both the trust’s assets and income as belonging to the beneficiary, potentially affecting their eligibility for Centrelink benefits. The trust’s control and the “control test” are factors in this assessment.

Read the FAQ

Costly Pitfalls: Testamentary Trust Setup Downsides

Establishing a Testamentary Trust typically incurs higher initial costs compared to a simple will, ranging from $2,500 to $5,000. While there are no ongoing costs until the Testamentary Trust is activated upon the will-maker’s death, it is important to be aware that there will be associated administrative costs for preparing annual tax returns once it is activated.

Read the FAQ

Maximize Wealth: CGT & Testamentary Trust Tax Benefits

Testamentary trusts offer potential benefits related to CGT. Capital gains can be distributed to beneficiaries with a potential 50% CGT discount, even if the assets were held for less than 12 months by the trust, provided the original owner held them for at least 12 months.

Read the FAQ

Demystifying Testamentary Trust Income Splitting

A Testamentary Trust allows for income splitting among family members, such as children and grandchildren. This means that beneficiaries can receive income from the trust and be taxed at adult marginal rates, potentially reducing the overall tax burden on trust-generated income.

Read the FAQ

Empower Minors: Testamentary Trust Tax Advantages

Income distributed to minors from a Testamentary Trust is considered ‘excepted trust income’ and is taxed at standard adult marginal tax rates instead of higher penalty rates, resulting in potential tax savings. Consider a scenario involving beneficiaries Ron and Tracey, who are minors and beneficiaries of a Testamentary Trust. When the trust generates income, distributing it equally between Ron and Tracey can result in substantial tax savings due to the special tax provisions for Testamentary Trusts. They will not be taxed at a penalty rate like the other trusts.

Read the FAQ

It’s advisable to review your Testamentary Trust deed and Will annually to accommodate life changes and legislative updates, such as new asset purchases or sales.

Read the FAQ

Power-Pick Trustee for Testamentary Trust: Key Considerations

When selecting a trustee, it’s essential to choose someone financially savvy and trustworthy. In cases with multiple beneficiaries and properties, you can consult with a legal team to have different trustees for multiple Testamentary Trusts.

Read the FAQ

To establish a Testamentary Trust effectively, you should:

  • Understand its purpose and benefits, including tax advantages.
  • Consider its impact on future generations.
  • Choose a reliable trustee.
  • Seek professional legal and accounting advice.
  • Keep the trust deed and your Will up to date.
Read the FAQ

Shield Assets: Testamentary Trust vs. Creditor Claims

Yes, assets within a Testamentary Trust, managed by a trustee, can provide protection against claims by third parties, such as creditors, toward the beneficiaries. The trustee holds the assets for the beneficiaries’ benefit, reducing vulnerability to such claims.

Read the FAQ

Secure Your Assets: Testamentary Trust and Spouse’s New Partner

A Testamentary Trust can safeguard your assets from being inherited by unintended beneficiaries, such as a new partner or their children, by specifying how the assets are distributed and placing them under the control of a trustee.

 

Read the FAQ

Empower Assets: Testamentary Trust and Divorce Impact

Yes, a Testamentary Trust can protect assets from being divided in the event of beneficiary divorces. The trust restricts access to the assets, ensuring they are preserved for the intended beneficiaries, regardless of any divorces.

Read the FAQ

Shield Assets: Testamentary Trusts and Legal Protection

Assets placed in a Testamentary Trust are legally owned by the trustee, not the beneficiaries. This arrangement can protect the assets from being seized in cases of personal lawsuits or bankruptcy involving the beneficiaries.

Read the FAQ

Secure Your Legacy: Protect Assets for Exclusive Family Benefit

Establishing a Testamentary Trust allows you to dictate the distribution of your assets, ensuring that only your chosen beneficiaries, such as your children and family, receive the inheritance as per your wishes.

Read the FAQ
  • A Testamentary Trust is a legal arrangement activated upon the death of a Will-maker. It allows assets, including properties, to be distributed to a trustee, who manages and distributes them to beneficiaries according to the terms specified in the Will.
Read the FAQ

A testamentary trust is a trust that is established through a person’s will and takes effect upon their death. It allows the testator (the person making the will) to specify how their assets will be managed and distributed after their passing. Testamentary trusts are commonly used for various purposes, including providing for the financial needs of beneficiaries, protecting assets from potential creditors, and minimizing tax liabilities. These trusts can be highly customizable, and the terms and conditions are typically outlined in the testator’s will, providing detailed instructions on how the trust is to be administered for the benefit of specific beneficiaries.

Read the FAQ

Yes, the Trust must have a bank account in the name of the trustee. For example, if your Trust is named XYZ Trust, and the trustee company is ABC Pty Ltd, the Trust bank account is typically created under the name ABC Pty Ltd ATF XYZ Trust. We recommend depositing the $10 Settlor fee as soon as the bank account is opened.

Read the FAQ

$10 is the sum our legal team suggests. Some court cases (a recent case we have seen is Cumins v FCT [2006] FCA 43) have not questioned a settled sum of $5. Nonetheless, a settled sum of at least $10 is advised.

Read the FAQ

In General:
a) If there is only one appointor, unless their will says otherwise, the powers of appointment will pass to their legal personal representatives.
b) If there are two or more joint appointors, as each one dies, the powers of appointment will pass to the remaining joint appointors until there is only one left. Then, the powers will pass to that person’s LPRs.
c) If any of the appointors are considered independent (e.g., an accountant or solicitor), then that person will never have the sole power of appointment. In other words, once there is only one family member appointor and the independent appointor remaining, the powers of appointment will pass to the family member’s LPRs upon their death. However, we require specific instructions in this regard to be specified in the schedule to the deed.
d) The appointors may choose not to be joint in the context of survivorship, meaning that upon their death, their own power of appointment will pass to
their own LPRs, rather than to any surviving joint appointors. When a husband and wife are joint appointors, the deed is set up as described in point 2 above.
Finally, an appointor may be automatically removed if they become bankrupt or mentally ill, or if the appointor is acting in the capacity of, or on behalf of, a trustee in bankruptcy, liquidator or administrator, or the Family Court Registrar, but they can resume their position if the condition that caused the Appointor to be removed ends, is reversed or otherwise ceases.

Read the FAQ

According to our legal team who sets up the trust for Investax it is generally the primary beneficiaries of the Trust become appointors due to the Control Issues.
You must consult with a lawyer or discuss this with your accountant if you would like to nominate a person to be an appointor who is not a primary beneficiary of the trust. A special instruction needs to be in place to inform the establishment team if the non-beneficiary appointor should be a joint appointor or an independent appointor.

Read the FAQ

Usually, Appointors are considered as a team, called joint appointors, unless we’re told otherwise. With joint appointors, if one person, let’s say Husband, is no longer there, the other person, in this case, Wife, takes over everything related to the trust. It’s like a last-person-standing situation where the surviving appointor becomes the boss of the trust.
In some trusts, there’s a special person called the independent appointor; This person is often an accountant or legal representative. They work alongside two other appointors, who make decisions together. However, once both regular appointors pass away, the independent appointor also steps down from their role.
This rule is in place to make sure that the accountant (or any other independentappointor) and their family don’t end up having complete control over the trust.

Read the FAQ

the role of the appointor holds paramount significance within the trust structure. This person has a lot of power because they can choose who runs (the trustee) the trust and can also remove them if needed. In other words, Appointors can remove the Trustee of the Trust.

Read the FAQ

As per our legal team who creates the Trust deed, the potential danger lies in whether the powers of the appointor can be considered as property If they are categorised as such, a trustee in bankruptcy, for instance, might have the ability to acquire and use these powers to appoint a trustee responsible for distributing assets to creditors, among other tasks. Unfortunately, it remains uncertain whether a trustee in bankruptcy has this capability.
However, even if this were possible (which is still unclear), an appointor is expected to exercise their powers in line with their fiduciary duties, meaning they should act in the best interests of all the trust beneficiaries.
Ultimately, this is a complex legal matter that requires specific legal advice. Nonetheless, as per our current deed, the office of an Appointor will be vacated if that Appointor:
(a) becomes bankrupt or seeks relief under bankruptcy laws; or
(b) acts as a trustee in bankruptcy, liquidator, administrator, or the Family Court
Registrar;
This provision is designed to enhance the trust’s security in case an appointor faces legal action.
Furthermore, having an independent appointor, like a trusted family accountant or
solicitor, can also bolster the trust’s security. This is because the deed mandates that appointment decisions must be made jointly, requiring unanimous agreement among the appointors.

Read the FAQ

Depending on the relevant state, if you are purchasing Residential Property in a trust and do not exclude foreign beneficiaries from the discretionary trust, you may incur a surcharge.
This exclusion is irrevocable for foreign persons. We recommend excluding foreign beneficiaries from your trust if your intention is to purchase residential property, regardless of the state, to avoid any unforeseen surcharges imposed by state legislation.

Read the FAQ

The Beneficiary of the Trust has beneficial ownership over the Trust property – essentially, it is for their benefit that the Trust has been created and administered.
In a Discretionary/Family Trust, beneficiaries do not have a fixed entitlement to the Trust's assets; instead, the trustee has the discretion to decide which beneficiaries receive Trust assets and the amounts they receive. However, this discretion is subject to the limitations outlined in the Trust Deed. While the trustee holds legal title to Trust property, they also bear equitable obligations to the beneficiaries, as specified in the Trust Deed. Beneficiaries in a Discretionary Trust can be categorized into two groups: Primary (or Specific/Designated) Beneficiaries, who are explicitly named in the Trust Deed, and Secondary (or General) Beneficiaries, who are determined based on their relationship to the Primary Beneficiaries, including certain family members, companies, and trusts controlled by the primary beneficiaries.
If you are setting up a Trust with your partner, both of you can be designated as
primary or named beneficiaries, ensuring equal benefits for both.

Read the FAQ

Most States and Territories have a rule that requires trusts to end after 80 years at the latest. This rule, known as the ”rule against perpetuities” ensures that assets can’t be tied up in a trust indefinitely. This is generally called vesting date.
South Australia abolished the rule against perpetuities some years ago, but even
there, any beneficiary can request to end the trust after 80 years. In all other States, this rule remains in place. The deed we facilitate has an 80-year vesting date so the trust must come to an end within 80 years.

Read the FAQ

We recommend a corporate trustee company due to the greater level of asset protection it provides. In contrast with an individual trustee, a corporate trustee allows for greater separation of trust’s assets and the personal assets of the directors and shareholders.
It also offers advantages in terms of lifespan and succession planning. If the directors or shareholders of the corporate trustee change, the entity remains the same, eliminating the need to transfer assets to another entity (avoid both CGT or Stamp Duty for the Transfer). Moreover, a corporate entity provides limited personal liability for its directors and shareholders regarding the company’s actions. In the event the trustee company cannot meet its debts, it may enter into liquidation, but the personal assets of directors and shareholders enjoy better protection. Asset management becomes more straightforward with a corporate trustee, as trust assets and personal assets are held in separate names.

Read the FAQ

The Settlor is the individual who “settles” a discretionary trust by transferring the settled sum to the Trustee (or Trustees).

The Settlor must also actually transfer the settled sum. If they fail to do so, the Trust will not come into existence. For a trust to be established, there must be trust property. In most situations, this trust property originates from the settled sum.

 

It’s considered best practice to appoint a close, yet unrelated, family friend as the Settlor. Our Legal team do not allow relatives of the beneficiaries or trustees to act as Settlors. The Settlor should be someone who will never benefit from the Trust. The trust deed specifically prohibits the Settlor from benefiting. This stipulation mainly prevents adverse tax consequences, as indicated in S.102 of the ITAA 1936. It also eliminates the risk of the Trustee inadvertently violating the trust deed by distributing assets to the Settlor.

There have been instances where the legitimacy of an entire trust was challenged because it was discovered that the Settlor (e.g., an accountant) charged a fee for the settled sum. This meant the sum was never genuinely gifted to the Trust, resulting in the absence of trust property, rendering the Trust nonexistent.

Read the FAQ

The main residence exemption under the CGT rules cannot generally apply to properties owned by a trust. The main residence exemption can generally only apply when the dwelling is owned by an individual – refer to section 118-110 ITAA 1997. There are some very limited exceptions to this including:

  • Where the property is held by a special disability trust.
  •  Where the property was owned by an individual just before they died and is now held in a deceased estate or testamentary trust, there are some special rules which can potentially enable the main residence exemption to apply; or
  • Where the occupier of the property is absolutely entitled to the property as against the trustee.
Read the FAQ